Lower School

Parker Lower School (grades K-5) is where academic excellence begins. The curriculum and special programs are designed to nurture students and guide them to take an active role in their learning. In addition to the dynamic curriculum, exciting field trips, and visiting presenters, special area offerings in visual arts, music, Spanish and physical education enrich the lower school experience.

Parker relies upon the most current research in child development and learning to empower and inspire students. Our students are conscientious individuals who are able to focus on learning, navigate conflicts, and respect and care deeply about one another.

Select any dot below and scroll down to read more about specific subject matter.

  Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade
Language Arts                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Mathematics                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Science                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Social Studies                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Spanish                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Visual Arts                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Music                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course
Physical Education                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course                                                             Course

Grades K-5 Visual Arts Course Offering

Visual Arts

What we do 

  • Explore and become comfortable with as many media as possible
  • Nurture each child’s sense of self through creative expression and development of skills that nurture multiple perspectives
  • Explore, identify, analyze and apply the elements and principles of art while developing knowledge and appreciation of art history, genres, artists and various media/materials 

HOW WE DO IT 

  • Drawing with crayon, marker, oil pastel
  • Painting with tempera and watercolor as well as acrylic painting on canvas and sumi-e
  • Collage
  • Ceramic clay and glazing
  • Printmaking
  • Mixed media

Kindergarten Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do

  • Utilize Spanish language immersion
  • Explore the basics of foreign language learning: numbers, colors, shapes, animals, weather and greetings
  • Introduce simple phrases and vocabulary
  • Employ repetition of songs, rhymes and stories so students can hear and easily mimic the rhythm and pronunciation of the language

How we do it

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Sequential learning:  listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Grade 1 Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do

  • Utilize Spanish language immersion
  • Build on the Spanish language vocabulary learned in kindergarten, adding insects, bodies, more numbers and additional greetings
  • Where appropriate, integrate curriculum with core subjects 

How we do it

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Viva el Español Learning System A is introduced
  • Integration of Brighter Child National Standards-based curriculum
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Sequential learning: listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Grade 2 Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do 

  • Utilize Spanish language immersion
  • Begin to write in Spanish and practice greater depth in vocabulary and description
  • Begin to emphasize key grammatical elements
  • Employ the core components of reading, writing, speaking and listening
  • Follow themes and topics taught in second grade, where appropriate

How we do it

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Viva el Español learning system A is continued
  • Integration of Brighter Child National Standards-based curriculum
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Sequential learning:  listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Grade 3 Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do 

  • Spanish language immersion
  • Deepen understanding through listening and speaking
  • Focus is on writing sentences, putting together vocabulary learned to date to make complete thoughts
  • Where appropriate, follow themes and topics taught in third grade 

How we do it 

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Viva el Español learning system B continued from second grade
  • Integration of Brighter Child National Standards-based curriculum
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Sequential learning: listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Grade 4 Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do 

  • Spanish language immersion
  • Listen, speak, read and write
  • Emphasize grammar and increasing vocabulary
  • Use workbooks to reinforce learning

How we do it

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Use of the textbook Realidades and accompanying materials
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Tests, quizzes, projects and homework
  • Sequential learning: listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Grade 5 Spanish Course Offering

Spanish

What we do 

  • Utilize Spanish language immersion
  • Focus on listening, speaking, reading, and writing
  • Learn grammar: making negative statements, subject pronouns, comparisons and superlatives, regular present tense verbs, infinitives, use of adjectives and expressing likes and dislikes
  • Conduct research on Latin American celebrations, Hispanic Heritage and geography 

How we do it 

  • Total Physical Response (TPR) used to teach Spanish at all levels
  • Craft- and art-based experiential learning and cultural exploration
  • Native speaker guest visits
  • Use of Realidades textbook and workbook
  • Sequential learning: listening, then speaking, and eventually writing and using correct Spanish grammar

Kindergarten Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do

  • Study self, family, and community
  • Discuss community helpers
  • Learn individual responsibilities and how to make positive choices 

How we do it 

  • Social Studies Alive, a curriculum used to introduce students to the concept of self, family and community.
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Grade 1 Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do

  • Explore the surrounding community
  • Focus on relating to others, roles and occupations, rights and responsibilities within the community, cultural values and practices, and the importance and functions of various services 

How we do it

  • Social Studies Alive, a curriculum used to introduce students to the concept of self, family and community
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Grade 2 Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do

  • Explore the theme of community  through visuals, mapping, experiential exercises, and problem-solving group work
  • Explore topics of inquiry including “What is Community?” and “How do People Use the Environment?” as well as questions about goods, services, consumerism, leadership, citizenship, and individuals making a difference 

How we do it 

  • Social Studies Alive, a curriculum used to introduce students to the concept of self, family and community
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Grade 3 Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do 

  • Physical & political geography and mapping skills
  • Native American culture and tradition (past/present)
  • Famous Americans
  • National, religious and cultural holidays
  • Branches of U.S. government
  • Laws, rights, responsibilities and citizenship 

How we do it 

  • Social Studies Alive, a curriculum used to introduce students to the concept of self, family and community
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Grade 4 Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do 

  • Focus on states, regions, and Hawaiian studies
  • Explore themes including Understanding Regions, Exploring and Living in the East, Exploring and Living in the South, Exploring and Living in the Mid-West, Exploring and Living in the West, Here in the Americas and Beyond.
  • Learn geography and map skills
  • Examine Hawai’i’s history and culture

How we do it 

  • Houghton Mifflin Social Studies: States and Regions
  • Hawaiians of Old text
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Grade 5 Social Studies Course Offering

Social Studies

What we do

  • Explore themes including: Our Land and First People, Exploration and Settlement, The Thirteen Colonies, The American Revolution, The New Nation, The Civil War, and The Twentieth Century
  • Practice geography and map skills 

How we do it 

  • Houghton Mifflin Social Studies: United States History
  • Hawaiian studies, including culture, mele (song) and hula (dance), taught all year by kumu hula (Hawaiian studies teachers)

Kindergarten Science Course Offering

Science

What we do 

  • Focus on the senses, weather, animals, living and non-living, wood, paper, and exploring the environment
  • STEM: (PLTW) Structure and Function: Exploring Design

How we do it 

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literacy
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

Grade 1 Science Course Offering

Science

What we do 

  • Explore modules about insects, weather, balance and motion, and things that grow 
  • STEM: (PLTW) Animal Adaptations and Animated Storytelling

How we do it 

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literac
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

 

Grade 2 Science Course Offering

Science

What we do 

  • Explore modules about magnets, plants, matter, types of rocks, dinosaurs and fossils, and nocturnal animals
  • Foster a curiosity about the living world
  • STEM: (PLTW) Materials Science: Properties of Matter

How we do it 

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literacy
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

Grade 3 Science Course Offering

Science

What we do

  • Focus on the structures of life, the immune system, biomes, animal classification, whales, food chains, and tropical rainforests
  • Explore physical science topics including states of matter, heat and sound energy and simple machines
  • Explore earth science topics including earth studies, volcanoes, earthquakes, the moon, constellations, water and rock cycle
  • STEM: (PLTW) Stability and Motion: Science of Flight

How we do it 

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literacy
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

Grade 4 Science Course Offering

Science

What we do 

  • Explore modules about earth materials, magnetism and electricity, solar system, and solar cars
  • Visit a live volcano: every other year the fourth and fifth grades culminate their study with a trip to Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park
  • STEM: (PLTW) Energy: Collisions and Input/Output: Human Brain

How we do it

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literacy
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

Grade 5 Science Course Offering

Science

What we do 

  • Focus on variables, levers and pulleys, the human body and solar boats
  • Visit a live volcano: every other year the fourth and fifth grades culminate their study with a trip to Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park
  • STEM: (PLTW) Infection: Detection

How we do it 

  • Full Option Science System (FOSS), a curriculum used for its hands-on, inquiry-based approach to scientific literacy
  • Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a curriculum used for its hands-on activities, projects and problems that engages students in critical and creative thinking while building the skills of collaboration and perserverance

Kindergarten Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do

  • Play age-appropriate games that focus on locomotor skills: walking, galloping, jumping, hopping, side-sliding, leaping, and skipping
  • Use equipment such as hula hoops, bean bags, balls, and jump ropes to learn tossing, striking, and catching
  • Practice thorough movement skills incorporating spatial awareness 

How we do it

  • Comprehensive program with a strong emphasis on fitness and fun through fundamentals
  • Development of self-confidence to participate in various forms of physical activities
  • Twice weekly participation in PE

Grade 1 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do 

  • Play age-appropriate games that focus on locomotor skills: galloping, jumping, hopping, side-sliding, leaping, and skipping
  • Use equipment such as hula hoops, bean bags, balls, and jump ropes to learn tossing, striking, and catching
  • Practice thorough movement skills incorporating spatial awareness
  • Introduce concepts of fair play and cooperation

How we do it 

  • Comprehensive program with a strong emphasis on fitness and fun through fundamentals
  • Development of self-confidence to participate in various forms of physical activities
  • Twice weekly participation in PE

Grade 2 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do 

  • Play a mixture of activities such as volleyball, rugby, basketball, and soccer
  • Introduce concepts of fair play, cooperation, and safety
  • Begin learning rules of games and handling of disagreements 

How we do it:

  • Development of self-confidence to participate in various forms of physical activities
  • Engagement in various cooperative games and activities
  • Twice weekly participation in PE

Grade 3 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do 

  • Develop specific skills such as passing, dribbling, shooting, and catching
  • Understand fair play, cooperation, and safety
  • Implement rules and strategies for handling disagreements

How we do it 

  • Comprehensive program with a strong emphasis on fitness and skill development by  increasing skill practice time
  • Development of self-confidence to participate in various forms of physical activities
  • Twice weekly participation in PE

Grade 4 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do 

  • Develop specific skills such as trapping, throwing, lay-ups, and positioning
  • Incorporate cooperative games and team building
  • Emphasize fitness development, which includes warm-ups and stretching
  • Practice fair play, cooperation, sportsmanship, and safety
  • Employ rules, strategies, and handling arguments

How we do it 

  • Practice time for manipulation of various equipment such as balls and rackets
  • Activities and games
  • Fitness assessments
  • Twice weekly participation in PE

Grade 5 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do 

  • Employ skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship playing various small group games and sports such as soccer, capture the flag, basketball, and volleyball
  • Incorporate cooperative and team-building activities
  • Emphasize fitness development, which includes warm ups and stretching

How we do it 

  • Practice time for manipulation of various equipment such as balls and rackets
  • Individual, partner and  group activities
  • Fitness assessments
  • Twice weekly participation in PE
  • Physical fitness testing

Kindergarten Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Learn proper percussion instrument playing techniques
  • Practice singing and matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Introduce the families of instruments in an orchestra
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Connect music with classroom curriculum
  • Begin recognizing musical note values
  • Use music and storytelling techniques to understand the qualities of performance

How we do it  

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing and dancing
  • Listening and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Grade 1 Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Learn proper percussion instrument playing techniques
  • Sing single melodies, matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Identify the families of instruments in the orchestra by sight and sound
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Connect music and movement with classroom curriculum
  • Write our own music, connecting musical rhythms to lyrics
  • Use music and storytelling techniques to develop in-class performances

How we do it 

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing and dancing
  • Listening to and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social, and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Grade 3 Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Sing, matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Begin to read music while playing percussion instruments properly
  • Play multiple parts simultaneously within a song
  • Connect music and movement to classroom curriculum
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Learn about composers and their music
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Write our own music, connecting musical rhythms to lyrics
  • Use music and storytelling techniques to develop in-class performances

How we do it  

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing, and dancing
  • Listening to and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Grade 3 Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Sing, matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Sing in two-part harmony
  • Read music while playing percussion instruments properly
  • Begin learning how to play the recorder
  • Connect music and movement to classroom curriculum
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Learn about composers and their music
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Write our own music, connecting musical rhythms to lyrics
  • Use music and storytelling techniques to develop in-class performances

How we do it

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing, and dancing
  • Listening to and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Grade 4 Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Sing, matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Sing in two-part harmony
  • Connect music and movement to classroom curriculum
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Learn about composers and their music
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Write our own music, connecting musical rhythms to lyrics
  • Read music while playing percussion instruments and recorder properly
  • Introduce world drumming
  • Begin to learn to read chord charts and strumming patterns on the ukulele

How we do it 

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing, and dancing
  • Listening to and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Grade 5 Music Course Offering

Music

What we do 

  • Sing, matching pitch both in group and individually
  • Sing in three part harmony
  • Connect music and movement to classroom curriculum
  • Listen purposefully to classical music
  • Learn about composers and their music
  • Connect to music through dance
  • Learn to write music and connect it to lyrics
  • Read music while playing percussion instruments, recorder and ukulele properly
  • Develop world drumming skills
  • Focus on creating musical ensembles

How we do it  

  • Student-centered learning based on action and reflection
  • Playing instruments, singing, and dancing
  • Listening to and creating music
  • Multi-arts approach to learning the elements of music and dance
  • Arts integration offering artistic, social and intellectual development through collaborative work utilizing instrumental and vocal music, creative movement, and dance genres

Kindergarten Mathematics Course Offering

Math

What we do 

  • Learn number sense, skip counting, odd & even numbers, graphing and place value
  • Explore sorting, positioning and patterning, comparing, representing and reading numbers
  • Learn components of time and measurement, capacity, comparing weights, money, addition, and subtraction
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps

Grade 1 Mathematics Course Offering

Math

What we do 

  • Explore number sense, number concepts, addition and subtraction
  • Learn data and graphing, geometry and fractions, probability, place value up to 100, order and comparison, patterns, time and money measurement and multiple digit addition and subtraction
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps

Grade 2 Mathematics Course Offering

Math

What we do 

  • Explore number concepts through 50 and addition and subtraction facts
  • Learn about data, graphing and probability
  • Understand place value, number concepts and patterns
  • Employ regrouping with addition and subtraction, counting and using money
  • Learn how to measure time on clock and calendar, length, weight, capacity and temperature 
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps

Grade 3 Mathematics Course Offering

Math

What we do 

  • Explore number sense:  place value and money, comparison, order and round numbers, counting coins and bills, and problem solving
  • Practice numbers and operations: addition and subtraction of whole numbers, estimations, multiplication and division
  • Learn to use fractions and decimals to compare, order, identify, add, and subtract
  • Explore data and probability by collecting, organizing, and analyzing data
  • Practice measurement of temperatures and time with calendars, using both customary and metric systems of measurement
  • Introduce geometry: learn to identify and classify plane and solid figures, symmetry, perimeter, area, and volume
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps

Grade 4 Mathematics Course Offering

Math

What we do 

  • Explore place value, comparing, ordering, and rounding whole numbers
  • Work with money, fractions, decimals, number theory, averages and algebraic reasoning
  • Practice multi-digit multiplication and division
  • Practice both customary and metric measurement, collecting and analyzing data in charts/graphs, plane figures, congruence, symmetry and transformations of geometric figures 
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps
  • Use of a differentiated curriculum wherein students are placed in the appropriate class based on their skill level; students may take 5th grade math

Grade 5 Mathematics Course Offerings

Math

What we do 

  • Practice measurement, graphing, and organizing data
  • Work with fractions, decimals and percentages in the four basic operations
  • Explore geometric and algebraic concepts
  • Calculate ratio, proportion, and probability
  • Computer science: coding

How we do it 

  • Math in Focus 2015 (Houghton Mifflin), a curriculum that teaches concepts using a concrete-pictorial-abstract learning progression
  • Technology integration using math apps
  • Use of a differentiated curriculum wherein students are placed in the appropriate class based on their skill level; students may take Advanced Math

Advanced Math

What we do 

  • Practice problem solving, number relationships, fractions and their operations, algebra, and integers
  • Employ data analysis and statistics, ratios and proportions, percents and decimals, and geometry

How we do it

  • Passport to Mathematics, a curriculum that allows students to experience mathematical relationships and strategies through the application of traditional algorithms and labs

Kindergarten Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Cultivate phonemic awareness, decoding skills, sight words, reading fluency and comprehension
  • Teach integrated spelling, handwriting and grammar
  • Utilize leveled reading texts

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Daily 5, a framework that fosters literacy independence
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including friendly letter and “I Like…” prompts
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Handwriting Without Tears
  • Read Well reading curriculum

Grade 1 Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Practice phonemic awareness, decoding skills, reading fluency and comprehension
  • Teach integrated spelling, handwriting and grammar
  • Utilize leveled reading texts

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Daily 5, a framework that fosters literacy independence
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including narrative, informational, and procedural writing
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Handwriting Without Tears
  • Read Well reading curriculum

Grade 2 Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Practice phonemic awareness, systematic phonics, spelling and vocabulary strategies, reading techniques and comprehension, grammar usage and mechanics, writing and penmanship
  • Utilize leveled reading texts

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Daily 5, a framework that fosters literacy independence
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including expository writing, poetry and creative writing
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Handwriting Without Tears
  • Read Well reading curriculum

Grade 3 Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do 

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Instruct students in the areas of decoding, comprehension, inquiry and investigation of meaningful literature
  • Build communication skills and writing skills through structured activities in spelling, vocabulary, the writing process, writing conventions, grammar, speaking, listening, mechanics, and penmanship as well as computer skills
  • Build oral language skills through individual and group presentations and persuasive speech writing and presentations 

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Daily 5, a framework that fosters literacy independence
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including descriptive, procedural, poetry, report writing, recounts and friendly letters
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Handwriting Without Tears
  • Novels read include:  Tale of Despereaux and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Grade 4 Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do 

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Employ a three-part reading program: preparing to read, reading and response, and language arts concentrating on communication skills such as spelling, writing strategies and grammar
  • Develop critical thinking, inference skills and comprehension skills

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Daily 5, a framework that fosters literacy independence
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including creative, narrative, persuasive and expository writing
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Novels read include: Percy Jackson and the Lightening Thief, The City of Ember

Grade 5 Language Arts Course Offering

Language Arts

What we do 

  • Integrate technology with reading/writing apps
  • Active reading of age-appropriate novels and interdisciplinary materials while practicing critical thinking skills and literary analysis
  • Practice and expand spelling, vocabulary and grammar

How we do it

  • A balanced literacy program that uses a variety of enriching literature
  • Read-alouds, shared reading, guided reading, and independent reading
  • Writer’s Workshop used to develop skills in various genres including expository, poetry, and creative writing
  • 6 Traits of Writing
  • Novels read include: Sign of the Beaver and Blood on the River

Grade 6 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do

  • Participate in cooperative and team-building activities
  • Employ the Five Components of Fitness
  • Implement skills, rules, strategies, and sportsmanship playing various small group games and sports such as soccer, capture the flag, rugby, street hockey, basketball, and volleyball
  • Introduce circuit training
  • Learn about health and nutrition
  • Conduct physical fitness testing

How we do it

  • Practice time for manipulation of various equipment such as balls and rackets
  • Individual, partner and group activities
  • Skills work, games and mile run
  • Fitness assessments
  • Participation in PE four times each week

Grade 7 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do

  • Employ skills, rules, and strategies in group activities while putting healthy competition and sportsmanship into action
  • Play small group games  and sports such as:  soccer, capture the flag, rugby, street hockey, basketball, and volleyball
  • Practice conflict resolution
  • Participate in cooperative and team-building activities
  • Employ the Five Components of Fitness
  • Practice circuit training
  • Continue learning about health and nutrition
  • Conduct physical fitness testing

How we do it 

  • Practice time for manipulation of various equipment such as balls and rackets
  • Individual, partner and  group activities
  • Skills work, games and mile run
  • Fitness assessments
  • Participation in PE four times each week

Grade 8 Physical Education Course Offering

Physical Education

What we do

  • Employ skills, rules, and strategies in group activities while putting healthy competition and sportsmanship into action
  • Play small group games  and sports such as:  soccer, capture the flag, rugby, street hockey, basketball, and volleyball
  • Participate in cooperative and team-building activities
  • Employ the Five Components of Fitness
  • Continue circuit training
  • Continue learning about health and nutrition
  • Conduct physical fitness testing

How we do it

  • Practice time for developing skills and manipulating equipment such as balls and rackets, flags, and fitness equipment
  • Individual, partner, and group activities
  • Skills work, games and mile run
  • Fitness assessments
  • Participation in PE four times each week

Grade 6 English Course Offering

English

What we do

  • Increase communication and thinking skills through reading, writing, speaking, listening and the study of the English language

How we do it

  • Study of rich and varied literature including novels, poetry, short stories, mythology/folklore and informational text
  • Use of varied literature listed above to model the different writing styles we will be working on: narrative writing, expository writing (descriptive, explanation, comparison and contrast, problem/solution), technical writing (friendly letters, thank-you notes, instructions, web pages), persuasive writing, and speech writing and delivery.
  • Study and practice of sentence fluency and construction, vocabulary, standard grammar and mechanics
  • Continual use of a multi-step method to writing: develop, revise, evaluate, and improve
  • Close attention to key qualities of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency and conventions.

Grade 7 English Course Offering

English

What we do

  • Extend communication and thinking skills through reading, writing, speaking, listening and the study of the English language

How we do it

  • Study of rich and varied literature including novels, poetry, short stories, mythology/folklore and informational texts
  • Use of varied literature listed above to model different writing styles: narrative, expository (descriptive, explanation, comparison and contrast, problem/solution) technical (friendly letters, thank-you notes, instructions, web pages), persuasive, and speech writing and delivery
  • Study of and practice in sentence fluency and construction, vocabulary, standard grammar and mechanics
  • Continual use of a multi-step method to writing: develop, revise, evaluate, and improve
  • Close attention to key qualities of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice, sentence fluency and conventions

Grade 8 English Course Offering

English

What we do

  • Deepen communication and thinking skills through reading, writing, speaking, listening and the study of the English language

How we do it

  • Study of rich and varied literature including novels, poetry, short stories, mythology/folklore   and informational texts
  • Use of varied literature listed above to model different writing styles: narrative, expository (descriptive, explanation, comparison and contrast, problem/solution), technical (friendly letters, thank-you notes, instructions, web pages), persuasive, and speech writing and delivery
  • Study of and practice in sentence fluency and construction, vocabulary, standard grammar and mechanics
  • Continual use of a multi-step method to writing: develop, revise, evaluate, and improve
  • Close attention to key qualities of writing: ideas, organization, voice, word choice sentence fluency and conventions

Grade 9 English Course Offering

English

What we do

  • Introduce freshmen to all of the essential elements of high school English study
  • Emphasize in-depth, active reading; note taking; organization and strong study habits
  • Focus on foundation skills in standard written English
  • Write in a variety of modes, from in-class responses to formal, multiply-drafted major papers
  • Examine and define allegory as a literary form and explore numerous examples of how it functions
  • Craft original allegorical pieces which also prominently feature allusion to major texts
  • Connect the Parker School Value Shield to all areas of study
  • Prepare students for higher level work by offering an honors option

How we do it

  • Active reading and discussion of major texts
  • Use of a variety of analytic strategies, including outlines, charts, and other graphic organizers
  • Required drafting, editing and revision of written products with both peer and teacher feedback
  • Assessment of graded writing both individually and in class to improve subsequent efforts
  • Mandatory redrafting of graded assignments to improve mechanics and style
  • Multiple, sequential exercises revising sample grammar and usage errors
  • Administration of spelling, definition and usage tests and exercises covering new vocabulary as well as daily online vocabulary study
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned

Grade 10 English Course Offering

English

What we do

  • Read and discuss literature in a variety of genres from a variety of perspectives
  • Explore themes that are common to many different modes of storytelling, such as identity, family, journeys, and power
  • Improve research skills to support one’s ideas and to deepen one’s understanding of the social and historical context of a text
  • Analyze the content, literary devices, and structure of a text through close reading
  • Develop critical thinking skills and practice clear expression of one’s ideas through oral, written, and other forms of communication
  • Prepare students for Advanced Placement Language and Composition by offering an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Written reflections, essays, and creative projects that respond to literature
  • Expository and creative writing projects to improve writing skills
  • Use of Membean.com and studying vocabulary in context to expand vocabulary skills
  • Submission of written work to a multi-stage revision process to improve understanding of grammar and syntax
  • Large- and small-group discussions and oral presentations to strengthen speaking and presentation skills
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional papers, projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned
  • Automatic qualification for the Advanced Placement Language and Composition course in the junior year with successful completion of the honors component every marking period, with an A- average

Grade 11 English Course Offerings

English

What we do

  • Introduce juniors to college-level authors and literary themes
  • Alternate between shorter thematic units and longer, in-depth study of specific authors’ works
  • Expect a heightened level of seminar participation
  • Refine written products to be ready for senior year and college
  • Develop written literary analysis in forms ranging from timed exam essays and informal, thematically centered shorter responses to multiply-drafted, formal five-paragraph essays
  • Prepare for the SAT and college application essays
  • Connect the Parker School Value Shield to all areas of study

How we do it

  • Study of authors recognized as college-level with introductory teacher lectures followed by student-led seminar discussion
  • Exhaustive refinement of written products, including thesis authorization, required drafting, in-class group editing and mandatory revision of graded assignments
  • A required series of SAT preparation exercises and practice exams
  • Daily online vocabulary study and tests

Ap Language & Composition

What we do

  • Challenge the most advanced English students in the school with a sophisticated and nuanced college-level curriculum as authorized by the College Board
  • Expect the highest level of written mechanical accuracy—AP juniors must have completed 10th grade honors English with a minimum 90% average
  • Introduce students to Aristotle’s Rhetorical Triangle and advanced rhetorical theory
  • Investigate the traits of an intellectually disciplined mind
  • Read a wide variety of rhetorical constructions, from essays and memoirs to novels, satire, allegory, political commentary and graphic fiction
  • Conduct increasingly student-led seminar discussions
  • Write from a vast array of rhetorical positions and purposes, continually refining usage of Aristotle’s triangle and the three appeals; critique peer work in discussion and in writing; extensively draft and revise written products of increasingly daring stylistic and rhetorical range
  • Prepare for the AP Language exam
  • Connect the Parker School Value Shield to all areas of study

How we do it

  • Study of advanced, college-level rhetorical pieces grouped thematically with units focusing on narrator bias, political rhetoric, satire and irony, post-modernism and memoir
  • Extensive, student-led seminar discussion
  • Building of “rhetorical toys”—short, informal constructions in a variety of thematic modes, shared orally and commented upon in writing during small peer group sessions
  • A craftsman’s approach to rhetoric and writing as an art form that requires careful planning, meticulous shaping and precise delivery
  • Mandatory AP practice exams and exercises
  • Daily online vocabulary practice and tests

Creative Writing

What we do

  • Read and discuss many forms and styles of literature
  • Develop each student’s voice as a writer
  • Become more perceptive readers who examine texts from a writer’s perspective
  • Learn new techniques to expand each writer’s toolbox
  • Experiment with new kinds of writing and continue to develop individual interests and strengths

How we do it

  • Examination of a variety of works chosen by the instructor and by students
  • Segmentation of large projects into different stages of the writing process, including freewrite, first draft, adding structure, sharing, and revision
  • Emphasis on writing all the time, and for different reasons: to entertain, express, criticize, and communicate; to warn, watch, and make a change; to exorcise demons and celebrate life; to share, uplift, play, poke, and laugh—and most of all, to discover more about the world and about ourselves

Grade 12 English Course Offerings

English

What we do

  • Reflect on the common theme of “journeys” as students prepare to launch into their great adventure of adulthood and explore the tortuous routes of this perpetually fascinating journey called “life”
  • Continue to explore different types of literature that require critical thinking, including modern classic novels, short stories, non-fiction, and poetry
  • Practice oral and written verbal skills in explication, argumentation, analysis and evaluation to prepare students for college-level courses
  • Target the improvement of analytical expository writing skills, college-application essays and creative writing expressions
  • Seek to develop a more sophisticated vocabulary and address lingering grammatical or mechanical issues
  • Participate in Poetry Out Loud, Shakespeare Recitation, and various essay contests and/or student publications

How we do it

  • Engagement in “active reading” or “close reading” of material that requires annotations and original interactions with the text
  • A focus on understanding writing as a process, not just a product; the writing process—which includes pre-writing, planning, drafting, revising, and editing—must be demonstrated with each major paper
  • Assessments, papers, and examinations which encourage students to think more deeply, to analyze, to find patterns, and to make connections to the real world and between specific materials
  • Graded “Seminar Circles”: student-led roundtable academic discussions focusing on specific literary works
  • Presentations, recitations, performances, debates and contests to support public speaking skills
  • Expository Explorations”—short writings of 200-400 words—which focus a student’s thoughts on one specific issue and “Literary Explorations” delving into an author’s use of a specific literary device or technique to achieve a particular purpose or effect
  • Major essays of 1000-2000 words, which allow the student to develop an original interpretation more completely and persuasively using substantial evidence from the literature assigned
  • Use of the Membean.com vocabulary program as well as additional vocabulary and grammar lessons to support student writing mechanics
  • Regular comparison of course content to national and state standards, SAT and ACT tests used by our students, and College Board recommendations to encourage review of basic skills, terminology, content and mechanics in both literature and composition to best prepare our students for the wider world
  • Use of MLA form and citations on all compositions

Ap Literature & Composition

What we do

  • Prepare students for the College Board’s Advanced Placement Literature and Composition national exam
  • Provide a rigorous English class experience focusing on developing college-level “close” reading, critical thinking, analytical and persuasive writing, oral argumentation and presentation
  • Introduce students to a variety of approaches to literary criticism as well as intense seminar discussions requiring students to present and defend sophisticated interpretations of specific works of literature both orally and in written expositions
  • Familiarize students with poetry and prose from the sixteenth century to the present with selections drawn from novels, short stories, poetry, drama, essays and speeches representing the most significant genres and literary movements
  • Encourage students to use various models of analysis to enrich their evaluation of a work’s internal structure, role in literary history, and social commentary as well as the author’s style, tone, themes, and command of rhetorical devices
  • Enhance the student’s love of language and appreciation for the writer’s craft

How we do it

  • Qualification for entry; students have successfully completed AP Language and Composition and should have a thorough understanding of rhetorical techniques and variety of composition styles and formats
  • Classroom expectations: each student must come to class alert, engaged, curious and prepared for all of us to accomplish our goals as we rely on one another; together we become more than the sum of our separate efforts
  • Required readings that familiarize students with poetry and prose from the sixteenth century to the present with selections drawn from novels, short stories, poetry, drama, essays and speeches representing some of the most significant genres, literary movements and writing styles
  • Engagement in “active reading” or “close reading” of material that requires annotations, original interactions with the text, and accurate analysis of literary devices employed by the author
  • Various models of analysis that encourage students to enrich their evaluation of a work’s internal structure, role in literary history, and social commentary as well as the author’s style, tone, themes, and command of rhetorical devices
  • Classroom lectures that provide background for basic eras and genres and assist students in placing works within a social-historical context
  • Employment of various critical lenses (historical, formalist, feminist, Freudian, Jungian, Marxist, post-colonial, etc.) to reveal hidden treasures in the literary works with an eye to improving students’ abilities to balance generalizations with supportive specific text-based evidence and illustrative detail
  • Experimentation with ideas and interpretations among peers in Seminar Circles to discover subtext and/or meaning together and potentially develop ideas for substantial essays
  • Expository Explorations”—short writings of about 300-500 words—which focus a student’s thoughts on a specific issue and “Literary Explorations,” which delve into an author’s use of a specific literary device or technique to achieve a particular purpose or effect
  • Major essays of about 1000-5000 words, which allow the student to develop an original interpretation more completely and persuasively using substantial evidence from the literature assigned
  • Demonstration of writing process—which includes pre-writing, planning, drafting, revising, and editing—for each major paper
  • Reading quizzes, unit tests and comprehensive final examinations for student assessment of the works assigned
  • In-class timed essays, AP-style multiple-choice questions, and full AP practice exams both in class and at home throughout the year
  • Public speaking skills developed through graded Seminar Circles, formal presentations, Poetry Out Loud and Shakespeare recitations
  • Expansion of general vocabulary as well as understanding and application of rhetorical techniques and literary devices through continual and demonstrable improvement in each student’s personal lexicon through the Membean.com vocabulary program, the mastery of literary terms and devices, the use of precise language, and the accurate application of terms in student discussion and writing
  • Use of MLA formats and citations on all compositions

Grade 6 Science Course Offerings

Earth Science & Health

What we do

  • Develop science applications such as scientific method, inquiry skills, content-specific vocabulary, data collection, graphing, and scientific research
  • Develop basic laboratory techniques including safety, measuring, and laboratory equipment use
  • Investigate the core scientific concepts of earth science including earth’s surface, minerals, rocks, mining, natural resources, earthquakes, volcanoes, water, weather, climate, and astronomy
  • Provide students with a better understanding of their own emotional and physical health, encouraging them to make healthy lifestyle choices.  Topics include: body systems (structure and function) and effects of drugs, alcohol and tobacco products

How we do it

  • Content reading and discussion
  • Inquiry and skil\ ls-based labs
  • Real-time data collection and graphical analysis
  • Multimedia projects and presentations

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies  (elective)

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Space Science & Techonology  (elective)

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Bridge Building  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Forensics  (elective)

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Grade 7 Science Course Offerings

Life Science & Health

What we do

  • Develop science applications such as scientific method, inquiry skills, content-specific vocabulary, data collection, graphing, and scientific research
  • Develop basic laboratory techniques including safety, measuring, dissection, and laboratory equipment use
  • Investigate the core scientific concepts of biological science, including characteristics and classification of living things, cell structure and function, genetics, kingdoms, and human body systems
  • Provide students with a better understanding of their own emotional and physical health, encouraging them to make healthy lifestyle choices. Topics include: decision-making and healthy choices in regards to responsibility, relationships, peer pressure, conflict management, and social media; fetal development; stages of life: infancy through death; effects of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco products

How we do it

  • Content reading and discussion
  • Inquiry and skills-based labs
  • Real-time data collection and graphical analysis
  • Outdoor classroom garden
  • Multimedia projects and presentations

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies  (elective)

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Space Science & Techonology  (elective)

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Bridge Building  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Forensics  (elective)

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Grade 8 Science Course Offerings

Physical Science and Health

What we do

  • Develop science applications such as scientific method, measuring, unit conversion, graphing, content specific vocabulary, basic laboratory techniques, and scientific research
  • Investigate core scientific concepts in physics (including energy and motion, waves, sound and light) and chemistry (including composition of matter, atomic structure, periodic table, chemical reactions, and nuclear chemistry)
  • Provide students with a better understanding of their own emotional and physical health, encouraging them to make healthy lifestyle choices.  Topics include: extensive study on the effects of tobacco, alcohol, and drug products;  reproductive health: male and female reproductive systems (structure and function); fetal growth and development; and stages of life

How we do it

  • Content discussion
  • Inquiry-based labs
  • Real-time data collection and graphical analysis
  • Computer application
  • Multimedia projects and presentations

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies  (elective)

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Space Science & Techonology  (elective)

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Bridge Building  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Forensics  (elective)

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Grade 6 History Course Offering

History

What we do

  • Deepen the understanding of the Earth and its peoples through the study of history, geography, politics, culture, and economic systems
  • Analyze the interactions among the various ancient cultures, emphasizing their enduring contributions and the link between the contemporary and ancient worlds
  • Develop higher levels of critical thinking by considering why civilizations developed where and when they did and why they declined
  • Recognize patterns, themes and developments in world history and geography
  • Develop academic writing skills
  • Develop note-taking skills

How we do it

  • Reading and examination of the text, Ancient Civilizations through the Renaissance
  • Examination and interpretation of primary sources
  • Study, interpretation and creation of maps, globes and charts
  • Study and recognition of the five themes of geography
  • Practice in responsible gathering of research
  • Summarization, paraphrasing and quotation using credible research
  • Demonstration of critical thinking in written form

Grade 7 History Course Offering

History

What we do

  • Deepen the understanding of the Earth and its peoples through the study of history, geography, politics, culture, and economic systems
  • Expand upon knowledge, skills and understanding acquired in the sixth grade examination of early civilizations
  • Study the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the age of exploration, the early peoples of the Americas,  the new empires in the Americas, and early United States history
  • Study world geography using the five themes of geography as a framework
  • Using critical thinking skills, analyze the various factors that shaped the development of societies and regions in the modern world

How we do it

  • Study and exploration of the texts, Ancient Civilizations through the Renaissance and United States History
  • Examination and interpretion of primary sources
  • Study, interpretation and creation of maps, globes and charts
  • Study and recognition of the five themes of geography
  • Practice in responsible gathering of research
  • Summarization, paraphrasing and quotation using credible research
  • Demonstratation of critical thinking in written form

Grade 8 History Course Offering

History

What we do

  • Deepen the understanding of the Earth and its peoples through the study of history, geography, politics, culture, and economic systems
  • Develop a more abstract level of understanding of social studies concepts
  • Study United States history and government, 1776 to the present
  • Study how power and responsibility are distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution
  • Deepen conceptual understandings in civics, geography, and economics
  • Write position papers backed up by credible research

How we do it

  • Study and exploration of the text, United States History
  • Examination and interpretation of primary sources
  • Study, interpretation and creation of maps, globes and charts
  • Study and recognition of the five themes of geography
  • Practice in responsible gathering of research
  • Summarization, paraphrasing and quotation using credible research
  • Demonstration of critical thinking in written form

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 Spanish Course Offerings

Spanish i

What we do

  • Provide students with basic conversation, reading, writing and listening skills in the Spanish language
  • Instruct on vocabulary and grammar related to the students’ daily lives, school, food, fitness and the restaurant, pastimes and going places, shopping, likes and dislikes, house, chores and vacation
  • Study and use regular and irregular verbs ending in the present tense, stem-changing verbs, present progressive tense and object pronouns
  • Count 1 -1000
  • Offer an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including family trees and a fashion show filmed using iMovie
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned

Spanish ii

What we do

  • Learn irregular preterite tense, irregular form commands, imperfect tense, negative commands, impersonal se, usted and ustedes commands and present perfect tense
  • Talk about the school day and extracurricular activities
  • Describe daily routines, shopping and money
  • Practice navigating a city, giving directions and reading a map
  • Describe students’ childhoods and favorite holidays
  • Discuss heroic acts, natural disasters and accidents
  • Understand cultural significance of fútbol and describe a game
  • Plan all aspects of a trip and learn appropriate tourist behavior
  • Offer an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Listening to story-telling in target language
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Cooperative group work and partner activities
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects and presentations, including: writing a host family letter, creating a personal time-line, filming a cooking show, and making a board game
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned

Spanish iii

What we do

  • Review the formation and difference between the preterite and imperfect tenses
  • Learn the following tenses: present subjunctive, commands with nosotros, present perfect subjunctive, future perfect, past subjunctive, and conditional
  • Describe art and sculpture, musical instruments, dance and drama
  • Discuss habits for good health, nutrition, exercises and staying in shape
  • Talk about personality traits, interpersonal behavior and friendship
  • Discuss the benefits and importance of volunteer work
  • Describe jobs and professions, qualities of a good employee, and technology
  • Read about and discuss myths and legends, ancient beliefs and pre-Columbian scientific discoveries
  • Describe architecture of Spain, read and discuss the encounter between Cortés and the Aztecs
  • Discuss caring for the environment
  • Offer an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Listening to story-telling in target language
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Watching an authentic Mexican soap opera
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Cooperative group work and partner activities
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects and presentations, including writing a life-event paper and working collaboratively on a poem project.
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned

Spanish iv

What we do

  • Participate in class discussions in the target language about the theme, lesson, moral and style of selected reading
  • Learn specific vocabulary associated with selected excerpts and poems by Latin American writers
  • Review all verb tenses, with a deeper focus on the subjunctive
  • Discuss various literary genres

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Listening to storytelling in target language
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Watching an authentic Mexican soap opera
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Cooperative group work and partner activities
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects and presentations, including writing a paper and giving a presentation on a Latin American poet, writer or musician; and completing a telenovela project (time permitting)

Spanish v

What we do

  • Read authentic texts and participate in class discussion in the target language about the following themes: personal identity, contemporary life, family and community, beauty and aesthetics, science and technology, and global challenges.
  • Watch and discuss Spanish films relating to the corresponding unit/chapter
  • Write short essays based on the themes of the text
  • Write, illustrate, and edit an original telenovela show using all verb tenses

How we do it

  • Listening to storytelling in target language
  • Class discussions
  • Watching an authentic Mexican soap opera
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Cooperative group work and partner activities
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects and presentations, including writing a paper and giving a presentation on a famous Latin American political figure; a book or movie review (presentation or paper); and creating, editing and filming a telenovela

Grade 8 Spanish Course Offerings

Spanish 1A

What we do

  • Introduce vocabulary pertaining to: calendar, body parts, weather, time, school supplies and the classroom, food and fitness, and sports and leisure activities
  • Study and use verbs ending in –ar, -er and –ir, as well as question words
  • Learn proper uses of ser and estar and ir
  • Count from 1 -100
  • Express student likes, dislikes, and pastimes
  • Learn adjective agreement and pronouns

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including research and report on winter holiday traditions in Latin America, Cinco de Mayo and a poem all about “me”
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 1B

What we do

  • Review Spanish 1A grammar and vocabulary
  • Introduce vocabulary pertaining to: family and fiesta, restaurant, shopping, house, chores and vacation
  • Introduce grammar pertaining to: irregular and stem-changing verbs, possessive adjectives, affirmative tú commands, direct object pronouns, preterite and present progressive verb tenses

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including researching and reporting on an influential Hispanic person and creating family trees and a fashion show film using iMovie
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 2A

What we do

  • Review Spanish 1B grammar and vocabulary
  • Learn the regular and irregular form of preterite tense verbs, the imperfect tense of verbs, negative and affirmative words and reflexive verbs
  • Discuss extracurricular activities and the school day
  • Practice navigating a city, giving directions and reading a map
  • Describe daily routines, shopping and money
  • Talk about childhood activities and celebrations

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including making a personal timeline and creating a childhood memoir
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 2B

What we do

  • Review Spanish 2A grammar and vocabulary
  • Expand on the use of the preterite and imperfect verbs
  • Learn the present perfect tense, indirect object pronouns, negative commands and impersonal se, usted and ustedes commands and use of por
  • Discuss heroic acts, natural disasters and accidents
  • Understand the cultural significance of fútbol and cultural perspectives on television
  • Describe movies, plots and characters
  • Follow a recipe and use cooking expressions
  • Plan all aspects of a trip and learn appropriate tourist behavior

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including creating a news show filmed with iMovie, making a board game and filming a cooking show
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish i

What we do

  • Provide students with basic conversation, reading, writing and listening skills in the Spanish language
  • Instruct on vocabulary and grammar related to the students’ daily lives, school, food, fitness and the restaurant, pastimes and going places, shopping, likes and dislikes, house, chores and vacation
  • Study and use regular and irregular verbs ending in the present tense, stem-changing verbs, present progressive tense and object pronouns
  • Count 1 -1000
  • Offer an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including family trees and a fashion show filmed using iMovie
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions
  • For honors track: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned

Grade 9 Science Course Offering

Biology

What we do

  • Provide students with a better understanding of life processes and the structure and function of living organisms
  • Investigate how living organisms interact and impact one another and the relationship between living organisms and their environment
  • Explore topics including matter-energy relationships, cellular function and structure, homeostasis, DNA/RNA, genes, heredity, ecosystems, biological evolution and classification to the six kingdom level
  • Learn experimental design, hypothesis formation, technology explorations, data collection, results display via graphs, tables & charts, and safe practices
  • Prepare students for Advanced Placement biology by offering an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Up-to-date PowerPoint presentations and occasional engaging supplementary videos on cutting-edge topics in biology and/or local science news
  • Expert guest speakers
  • Application of informed higher-level thinking, reasoning and in-class discussion of current scientific issues
  • In-class multimedia activities and hands-on and digital fabrication
  • Home reading, workbook and vocabulary flashcards (all available on iPad)
  • Hands-on, inquiry-based investigations involving data-collection and analysis, including the use of state-of-the-art equipment
  • Nurturing and investigations in the school garden and elsewhere on campus
  • Implementation of student-designed and student-run field science research projects in our native ecosystems and presentation of research results for peer-review
  • Chapter tests and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Adherence to National Science Educational Standards
  • Completion of additional assignments and projects and further investigation of core topics by students wishing to receive credit for Honors Biology
  • Automatic qualification for AP Biology for this receiving an A- in honors Biology

Grade 10 Science Course Offerings

Chemistry

What we do

  • Learn about conservation of matter and energy
  • Discover behavior and properties of matter
  • Understand the particulate nature of matter
  • Study equilibrium and driving forces
  • Prepare students for Advanced Placement chemistry by offering an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and discussions
  • Demonstrations and video clips
  • Guided inquiry and investigation in the lab
  • Online lab simulations
  • Tests and lab reports
  • For honors chemistry: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned
  • Automatic qualification for the Advanced Placement course in the junior or senior year with successful completion of the honors component and an A- average

Project Physics

What we do

  • Explore physical phenomena with an emphasis on practical application
  • Learn about Newtonian mechanics, electrical circuits, sound and waves, and light and optics

How we do it

  • Basic mathematics
  • Reinforcement of conceptual understanding
  • Laboratory experimentation
  • Hands-on construction of devices

Honors Physics

What we do

  • Introduce physics for students interested in technical or scientific fields
  • Explore mechanical motion, electricity and magnetism, fluid mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, waves and sound, light and optics
  • Learn about atomic, nuclear, and particle physics

How do it

  • Conceptual understanding
  • Analytical mathematics
  • Logical reasoning
  • Laboratory experimentation
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry
  • Co-requisite: Algebra II/Trigonometry

Marine Science  (elective)

What we do

  • Study the chemical, physical, and geological aspects of the ocean
  • Gain knowledge about the ecology of various sea zones, marine communities, and the diversity of marine organisms
  • Learn the characteristics of marine phyla and how to classify a marine organism
  • Study the many aspects of ocean conservation
  • Learn about tides, currents, and wave dynamics
  • Research ichthyology, particularly fish body shape and how it relates to habitat and movement
  • Analyze sand to discover where it might have come from based on a number of geological variables
  • Explore marine archeology with a focus on Hawaii maritime history

How we do it

  • Hands-on labs including dissections and a wave tank
  • Student designed and conducted experiments
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion
  • Study of live creatures such as starfish, urchins, and microscopic organisms such as plankton
  • Field trips to research turtles, dolphins, and examples of shipwrecks along the coast
  • Year-long elective

Grades 11 & 12 Science Course Offerings

Project Physics

What we do

  • Explore physical phenomena with an emphasis on practical application
  • Learn about Newtonian mechanics, electrical circuits, sound and waves, and light and optics

How we do it

  • Basic mathematics
  • Reinforcement of conceptual understanding
  • Laboratory experimentation
  • Hands-on construction of devices

Honors Physics

What we do

  • Introduce physics for students interested in technical or scientific fields
  • Explore mechanical motion, electricity and magnetism, fluid mechanics, heat and thermodynamics, waves and sound, light and optics
  • Learn about atomic, nuclear, and particle physics

How do it

  • Conceptual understanding
  • Analytical mathematics
  • Logical reasoning
  • Laboratory experimentation
  • Prerequisite: Chemistry
  • Co-requisite: Algebra II/Trigonometry

Marine Science  (elective)

What we do

  • Study the chemical, physical, and geological aspects of the ocean
  • Gain knowledge about the ecology of various sea zones, marine communities, and the diversity of marine organisms
  • Learn the characteristics of marine phyla and how to classify a marine organism
  • Study the many aspects of ocean conservation
  • Learn about tides, currents, and wave dynamics
  • Research ichthyology, particularly fish body shape and how it relates to habitat and movement
  • Analyze sand to discover where it might have come from based on a number of geological variables
  • Explore marine archeology with a focus on Hawaii maritime history

How we do it

  • Hands-on labs including dissections and a wave tank
  • Student designed and conducted experiments
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion.
  • Study of live creatures such as starfish, urchins, and microscopic organisms such as plankton
  • Field trips to research turtles, dolphins, and examples of shipwrecks along the coast
  • Year-long elective

Anatomy & Physiology  (elective)

What we do

  • Employ a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body
  • Understand basic biochemistry; cells and tissues; and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems.
  • Learn the structure and function of each system
  • Explore health and medical opportunities

How we do it

  • Use of hands-on labs including dissections
  • Student-designed and conducted experiments.
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations using microscopy, building models and computer applications
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion.
  • Field trips to the University of Hawaii cadaver lab
  • Year-long elective

ap Biology  (elective)

What we do

  • Encourage students to take more responsibility for their learning in a fast-paced and rigorous college-level course
  • Provide students with a strong foundation in topics including evolution, molecular and cellular biology, energy transformation, homeostasis, heredity, plant and animal structure and physiology, behavior, ecology, and system interactions
  • Prepare students for the College Board’s AP Biology Exam

How we do it

  • Implementation of “flipped teaching model” in which students watch video lectures at home, allowing them to absorb information at their own pace and complete associated questions
  • In-class demonstrations, hands-on projects, and online activities allowing one-on-one interactions between the teacher and the student, as well as collaborations between students
  • Occasional engaging supplementary videos and/or articles and group discussions on cutting edge biological investigation, discoveries and local and/or current events in science, allowing students the opportunity throughout the course to make connections with the applications of modern biology to today’s environmental, ethical, health, and social problems
  • Guided reading notes on etext in class and at home using collaborations and teacher guidance as resources
  • Hands-on, inquiry-based laboratory investigations implementing recent technologies
  • Practice questions, essays and full tests which mimic the College Board’s AP Biology Exam
  • Coursework and laboratory investigations aligned with the College Board’s AP Biology Curriculum Framework

ap Chemistry  (elective)

What we do

  • Challenge students in a second-year chemistry course designed to be equivalent to a first- year college level chemistry course
  • Explore advanced theoretical and physical understanding of chemistry, topics include chemical reactions, stoichiometry, electrochemistry, thermochemistry and thermodynamics, kinetics, solution and acid-base equilibrium, atomic structure, bonding and periodicity, gas laws, states of matter and intermolecular forces
  • Complete several complex and demanding laboratories
  • Prepare students for the College Board’s AP Chemistry Exam

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and demonstrations supplemented with video lectures and guided reading notes with questions.
  • Guided inquiry and investigation of laboratory activities aligned with the College Board’s AP Chemistry implementing recent technologies
  • Daily topic questions, in class and as homework
  • Frequent individual practice questions to check understanding of individual topics
  • Summative assessments for each topic including multiple choice and free response questions modeling the AP College Board Exam

Ap Physics  (elective)

What we do

  • Build upon student’s understanding of physics up to the level of a first year college-level introductory physics course
  • Prepare students for at least one of the four available AP Physics exams and the opportunity to earn college credit
  • Build a strong foundation in physics topics including those covered on the AP Physics 1 and 2 exams: Newtonian mechanics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, fluids, electrostatics, electrical circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, mechanical waves, optics, quantum physics, atomic physics, and nuclear physics
  • Offer an opportunity for interested students to pursue a greater depth of knowledge in a more limited scope of topics covered in the AP Physics C examinations: kinematics, Newton’s laws, energy, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, gravitation, electrostatics, conductors and capacitors, electrical circuits, magnetic fields, and electromagnetism

How we do it

  • Use of college-level textbooks, references, and laboratory equipment
  • Application of scientific models and mathematics to real world questions or scenarios to become scientifically literate citizens
  • Engagement in hands-on, inquiry-based laboratory work where students design and implement experiments to address a question by applying their knowledge of physical concepts
  • Practice of data analysis, evaluation of evidence, and development of scientific communication skills
  • Curriculum framed around the College Board’s foundational physics principles
  • Opportunities to engage in the AP Science Practices which use the principles of scientific inquiry to promote a more rigorous student experience
  • Timed practice solving problems that mimic difficulty and scope of the AP examinations, including full-length practice examinations
  • For students interested in Physics C, the use of a “flipped” course wherein students learn information at their own pace to gain a greater depth of knowledge in a more focused field of study
  • Prerequisite: Honors Physics
  • Prerequisite: Algebra II/Trigonometry and current enrollment in a mathematics course
  • Prerequisite (for Physics C): Precalculus and current enrollment in (or completion of) calculus

Grade 12 Math Course Offerings

Algebra ii

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Practice data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Algebra ii/Trigonometry

What we do

  • Practice polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Learn systems of polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Solve problems using exponents and logarithms
  • Solve analytic geometry equations
  • Develop an understanding of trigonometry

How we do it

  • Development of advanced algebra skills
  • Daily practice solving mathematical problems
  • Use and programming of T.I. calculator

Probability & Statistics  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore patterns and departures from patterns in data
  • Plan for and conduct experimental studies
  • Anticipate outcomes of random events using probability
  • Test hypotheses for statistical validity

How we do it

  • Individual and small group work collecting and analyzing data
  • Use of technology for investigation and analysis
  • Projects and laboratories
  • Development of writing skills to convey results

Pre-Calculus

What we do

  • Learn about how equations and their graphs relate to mathematical models
  • Work with periodic functions and their different components
  • Use parametric functions to model real world situations
  • Explore the properties of polar coordinates and relation to polar equations for conic sections
  • Use matrices to perform transformations and complete iterations
  • Investigate fractals, their dimensions, and how to perceive them in nature
  • Examine sequences and series and learn how to derive formulas for them
  • Provide an introduction to calculus comprising of limits, derivatives, and integrals

How we do it

  • Inductive and deductive reasoning to problem solve in real-world applications of topics
  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions and to compute quantities

Ap Calculus Ab

What we do

  • Gain knowledge of limits as they are related to integrals and learn how to take the limit of different combinations of functions.
  • Study how to take derivatives of a number of different functions and how to apply derivatives to acceleration, maxima and minima, and velocity
  • Discover how to take the indefinite and definite integral of a number of different functions and how to apply integrals to area, mass, pressure, and volume
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a first semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework

Ap Calculus Bc

What we do

  • Become skilled at physics-based problems that focus on work, force, and variable-factor products
  • Study sequences and series, particularly power, Taylor and Maclaurin series and discover how limits are related to series and integrals are related to sequences
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a second semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Acceptance of students who have completed AP Calculus AB as a pre-requisite for the class
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homeworks

Grade 9 History Course Offering

World History

What we do

  • Study human origins
  • Learn about ancient civilizations
  • Examine the formation of early religions, first empires, the Classical period, early Christianit and the age of exchange and encounter

How we do it

  • Active reading, lectures and note taking
  • Telescoping big picture ideas
  • Employment of iPad apps, graphic organizers and map reading
  • Analyzing key concepts in history
  • Research and group work
  • Developing historical writing skills
  • Learning how to read and understand primary source documents
  • Varied assessments
  • Multimedia presentations by students and teacher

Grade 10 History Course Offering

Western Civilization

What we do

  • Study the formation of Western Europe, European Renaissance and Reformation, Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution, European exploration, revolutions and nationalism, imperialism and industrialization, world wars and postwar restructuring
  • Prepare students for Advanced Placement history by offering an optional honors track

How we do it

  • Telescoping big picture ideas
  • Analyzing key concepts
  • Active reading and note-taking
  • Lectures, class activities, and group research
  • Use of iPad apps, graphic organizers and map-reading
  • Reading from primary sources
  • Developing historical writing skills
  • For honors component: completion of regular coursework as well as additional projects and assignments provided by the course instructor each marking period; successful completion noted on the student transcript for each marking period the credit is earned
  • Automatic qualification for the Advanced Placement U.S. or European history course in the junior or senior year with successful completion of the honors component with an A- average

Grade 11 & 12 History/Social Science Course Offerings

Us History

What we do

  • Create an overview of American history from European contact to the present
  • Recognize recurring themes, structures and patterns in American society
  • Analyze both historic and current choices within their political, social, economic, and intellectual contexts
  • Understand causes and effects relating to specific developments and actions
  • Develop a sense of the flow of time and sequencing of events
  • Familiarize students with United States geography and its role in US history
  • Consider students’ own roles as citizens in a democratic-republic
  • Envision the possible futures, issues, and solutions for the United States of America

How we do it

  • Use of textbook support materials, graphic organizers, iPad apps, maps, and teacher-generated lessons to improve each student’s capacity for close reading and critical analysis
  • Individual and small group projects, varied assessments, tests and essay composition to develop student study, presentation and expository writing skills
  • Structured class discussions including connections to the Parker School Value Shield” and its application to both public and private American life;
  • Application of MLA guidelines for all citations and essay formatting

aP United States History

What we do

  • Provide a solid grounding in the political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of the United States necessary for the pursuit of a social science or humanities major in college
  • Review fundamental patterns, events, and developments of US history from colonial origins to the present
  • Acquaint students with methods of historical research and analysis using both primary and secondary sources and the central theories of major historians
  • Enhance students’ abilities to weigh evidence, detect bias, argue historical interpretations, and reach fact-based conclusions
  • Recognize and explore the myriad influences which “cause” historical events and trends as well as the “effects” or consequences of these same events and patterns
  • Evaluate the significance of specific events, general trends and vast movements within the context of their own eras
  • Prepare students to take and pass the national Advanced Placement US History Examination in the spring;
  • Consider students’ own roles, rights and responsibilities as an adult participant in American society in light of the Parker School “Value Shield”

How we do it

  • Admission of students who show a high level of motivation and potential for success both in the course and on the AP U.S. History exam. Those who complete a full year of honors history with an A- average automatically qualify to take the AP course
  • Use of “active reading or close reading” to enhance student reading comprehension for information acquisition and to habituate the use of a textbook as a tool
  • Practice in methods of historical research and analysis using both primary and secondary sources
  • Development of students’ abstract thinking skills in chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, historical argumentation, interpretation and synthesis as per the College Board AP requirements
  • Support of effective study habits with published and/or online AP guides, textbook materials, web links, graphic organizers, iPad apps, maps, and teacher-generated lessons;
  • Development of students’ presentation skills and expository writing skills through individual and small group projects, varied assessments, tests and essay compositions;
  • Engagement in structured class discussions including connections to the Parker School Value Shield and its application to both public and private American life
  • Honing of critical thinking skills, written expression and critical analysis while seeking to develop a lucid, effective writing style
  • Applyication of MLA guidelines to all citations and essay formatting;
  • Requiring all class members to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement US History Examination in the spring

Ap European History

What we do

  • Provide a solid grounding in the political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual history of Europe necessary for the pursuit of a social science or humanities major in college
  • Review fundamental patterns, events, and developments of European history from 1450 to the present
  • Acquaint students with methods of historical research and analysis using both primary and secondary sources and the central theories of major historians
  • Enhance students’ abilities to weigh evidence, detect bias, argue historical interpretations, and reach fact-based conclusions
  • Recognize and explore the myriad influences which “cause” historical events and trends as well as the “effects” or consequences of these same events and patterns
  • Evaluate the significance of specific events, general trends and vast movements within the context of their own eras
  • Prepare students to take and pass the national Advanced Placement European History Examination in the spring
  • Consider students’ own roles, rights and responsibilities as adult participants in a global society in light of the Parker School Value Shield

How we do it

  • Admission of students who show a high level of motivation and potential for success, both in the class and on the AP European History exam. Those who complete a full year of honors history with an A- average automatically qualify to take the AP course
  • Use of “active reading or close reading” to enhance student reading comprehension for information acquisition and to habituate the use of a textbook as a tool
  • Practice in methods of historical research and analysis using both primary and secondary sources
  • Development of students’ abstract thinking skills in chronological reasoning, comparison and contextualization, historical argumentation, interpretation and synthesis as per the College Board AP requirements
  • Support for effective study habits with published and/or online AP guides, textbook materials, web links, graphic organizers, iPad apps, maps, and teacher-generated lessons
  • Development of students’ presentation skills and expository writing skills through individual and small group projects, varied assessments, tests and essay compositions
  • Engagement in structured class discussions
  • Honing of critical thinking skills, written expression and critical analysis while seeking to develop a lucid, effective writing style
  • Application of MLA guidelines to all citations and essay formatting
  • Requiring all class members to take the College Board’s Advanced Placement European History Examination in the spring

Hawaiian Studies

What we do

  • Review the history and culture of Hawai‘i from settlement by Polynesians through to the annexation of Hawai’i to the United States
  • Explore the natural history of the Hawaiian islands, society & culture in ancient Hawai‘i, and the effects of European contact
  • Encourage open-minded and critical thinking

How we do it

  • Up-to-date PowerPoint presentations and occasional supplementary videos on historical, current topics and/or local news
  • Expert guest speakers on a variety of topics from science to culture
  • At least one field trip to visit the voyaging canoe, Makali’i, at Kawaihae and Pu’ukohola Heiau National Historic Site, including presentations by experts at both sites
  • Hands-on learning in the School Garden and elsewhere on campus
  • Hands-on explorations and analytical reading and writing on a range of topics using a variety of tools, documents and videos
  • A focus on making subject matter relevant and meaningful to the present, and to each student, integrating across disciplines and engaging all senses, to make topics accessible and stimulating
  • Vocabulary eflashcards (available on iPad via Quizlet)

Psychology  (elective)

What we do

  • Examine the origins of psychology
  • Understand psychological research methods and statistics
  • Study life span, the connection between mind and body, cognitive processes, personality, and psychological disorders
  • Explore careers in psychology

How we do it

  • Reading of case studies
  • Lab activities
  • Problem solving using the scientific method
  • Class discussions and note-taking
  • Active reading
  • Writing and research

Philosophy  (elective)

What We Do

  • Introduce students to a broad spectrum of philosophical thought from 700 BCE to the present in both Western and Eastern traditions
  • Discuss abstract philosophy in a college-style seminar environment
  • Craft a variety of written responses to the works of philosophers in the form of responses, reviews, dialogues, commentaries, projects and formal essays
  • Devise an original, individual philosophical statement

How We Do It

  • Reading of entries on a given philosopher and conducting in-depth seminar discussions
  • Crafting detailed and formally appropriate responses to a variety of philosophical queries, proposals, conundrums and implications

Sociology  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore the origins of sociology and theoretical sociological perspectives
  • Learn about the methods, procedures, and ethics involved in sociological research
  • Examine culture, social structures, and socialization, including within groups, formal organizations and social institutions
  • Investigate societal deviance and social control
  • Discuss inequalities of race, ethnicity, age and gender
  • Explore the impetus for and issues around social change

How we do it

  • Lectures, note-taking, lab activities, group work, skits and role playing
  • Conducting sociological research (via readings, primary source documents, case studies, media and surveys)
  • Learning and applying problem-solving skills in analyzing and interpreting data

Grade 7 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

New Media

What we do

  • Understand new media tools/technologies and their use in the context of Parker School’s core values of excellence, integrity and compassion.
  • Create our own art/writing/ideas and pair with the most effective medium for communication and sharing

How we do it

  • Utilization of safety and ethics materials from Common Sense Media and various other digital resources
  • Exploration and creation of students’ visual, audio, written and technological ideas using their iPads and other personal devices (with parental permission)
  • Utilization of current Internet and iPad tools to format and share the work

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of  public forum debate
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intra-squad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition

MATHEMATICS

Math Counts

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions

SCIENCE & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Bridge Building

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Forensics

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Space Science & Techonology

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Grade 10 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of the three interscholastic debate events: policy, public forum and Lincoln-Douglas
  • Introduce students to the various drama and speech events available through the Hawaii Speech League
  • Provide instruction leading to mastery of the advanced levels of speech and debate events
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intrasquad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition
  • Traveling to six interscholastic tournaments on O’ahu and hosting two more at Parker School

Student Council

What we do

  • Plan and execute a wide variety of events to benefit the student body and the school and North Hawaii community, such as dances, pep rallies, charity drives, and community service
  • Act as a liaison between the administration and the student body and a voice for student-sponsored initiatives; solicit feedback from students about changes to policies or traditional events
  • Communicate with students about upcoming events
  • Work to positively impact student life at Parker School
  • Learn to be planners and leaders; develop confidence in one’s ideas and ability to implement them
  • Develop public speaking skills
  • Become adept at working as part of a team and sharing or alternating leadership responsibilities
  • Develop a sense of responsibility to a community and the tools to reach out and help others
  • Learn to be accountable for both successes and mistakes and to follow through on all undertakings
  • Prepare to undertake leadership roles on college campuses and in different job and life situations

How we do it

  • Officers’ and adviser’s summer retreat to share ideas, establish areas of responsibility and plan the year’s calendar
  • Yearly elections to model the democratic process; provide the student body with the opportunity to choose their representatives and feel invested in their student government; and provide candidates with an opportunity to campaign, publicly justify their candidacy and experience, write and deliver a speech, and take the risk of competing with others for office
  • Twice- weekly officer-led meetings with student council members and weekly officer planning and progress check-in meetings
  • Organization of labor into committees led by student-elected officers and representatives
  • Student ownership of ideas, process and outcomes with adviser input and guidance
  • Review of lessons learned at the end of each event
  • Abidance to student-written by-laws based on those used at other schools nationwide and revised as needed according to established guidelines stated in said by-laws
  • Student-led and –planned weekly upper school “family meetings”

PERFORMING ARTS

Acting & Scene Study

What we do

  • Learn the actor’s basic technical skills for voice, body, and imagination
  • Study play structure and character development
  • Build on skills incrementally, including developing relationships between characters
  • Learn to work collaboratively on writing and/or producing stage and/or video projects
  • Develop skills to perform increasingly complex dramatic relationships

How we do it

  • Development of characters through improvisation games, theatre exercises, and both scripted and original individual monologues
  • Two- or three-person scenes developed through through group improvisation, rehearsal and scene study
  • Whole-class collaboration on a new project each year, such as original playwriting, staging on a short one-act play, or shooting a video short

Choreography

What we do

  • Choreograph original pieces exploring style, theme, music selection, composition, costuming and lighting
  • Understand and utilize dance criticism for improvement

How we do it

  • Class exercises in dance improvisation and composition
  • Viewing and critique of dance performance live and on video
  • Opportunities for students to choreograph for student showcases, the fall play and/or spring musical, according to the needs of each production
  • Opportunities for live performance and video archiving of student work 

  • Pre-requisite: Grade of “B” or better in Intro to Dance Technique or permission of the teacher

Chorus

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of different singing opportunities
  • Develop knowledge of the elements of music, proper vocal techniques, and music reading skills
  • Sing a wide variety of quality choral music including traditional choral music, contemporary music, show choir, and a capella
  • Learn to read music and sight sing
  • Learn to sing in two part harmony
  • Include movement and dance to accompany music
  • Encourage students to engage in their learning and take leadership roles within the chorus

How we do it

  • Vocal warm-ups to ensure proper singing technique
  • Singing and listening to a wide variety of choral music
  • Whole ensemble and small group work
  • Working daily on sight singing exercises
  • Creation of a positive musical experience through community building
  • Group work leading to performance and reflection
  • Student-centered approach to learning
  • Focus on preparing and motivating students to pursue higher level choral groups within the Parker School choral program as well as individual creative interest

Dance        

What we do

  • Develop strength, flexibility, and musicality
  • Learn the history of different dance forms
  • Study ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean styles

How we do it

  • Instruction in ballet technique at the barre and centre floor
  • History of ballet research paper
  • Jazz warm-ups, isolations, rhythm and syncopation
  • Jazz history research paper
  • Modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean/Dunham Technique
  • Dance philosophy paper and final project
  • One research project each trimester
  • Stretches, warm-ups, locomotor skills, musicality and choreographic combinations appropriate to the study of each genre
  • Opportunities for public performances throughout the year

Songwriting

What we do

  • Introduce student musicians to the fundamental techniques of songwriting and recording
  • Focus exclusively on original student compositions
  • Experience the technology of a recording studio environment as a compositional element
  • Require group collaboration and problem solving
  • Employ the full range of iPad related recording and music production resources
  • Share student songs online

How we do it

  • Assessment of individual student musical abilities and tastes
  • Training in basic performance and rehearsal strategies, including instrumentation, arrangement and practice sessions as compositional sketchpads
  • Employment of a full range of advanced music production technology from initial signal processing through multitrack recording, overdubbing and editing to final mix
  • Working in small groups with the integrity of the song as the highest priority
  • Final positing of finished student compositions to school websites

SCIENCE & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Marine Science

What we do

  • Study the chemical, physical, and geological aspects of the ocean
  • Gain knowledge about the ecology of various sea zones, marine communities, and the diversity of marine organisms
  • Learn the characteristics of marine phyla and how to classify a marine organism
  • Study the many aspects of ocean conservation
  • Learn about tides, currents, and wave dynamics
  • Research ichthyology, particularly fish body shape and how it relates to habitat and movement
  • Analyze sand to discover where it might have come from based on a number of geological variables
  • Explore marine archeology with a focus on Hawaii maritime history

How we do it

  • Hands-on labs including dissections and a wave tank
  • Student designed and conducted experiments
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion
  • Study of live creatures such as starfish, urchins, and microscopic organisms such as plankton
  • Field trips to research turtles, dolphins, and examples of shipwrecks along the coast
  • Year-long elective

VISUAL ARTS

Photography & Cinematography

What We Do

  • Explore photography as a historical and contemporary form of art and communication
  • Develop an understanding of the role photography has played in social, cultural, and political events from its inception in early 19th Century to the present day
  • Discover the elements and principles of design and rules of composition
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional photographic techniques such as photographic science, darkroom work, digital photography and polaroid manipulation
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Exploration of different types of photography: sports and action, portrait, nature, social and political, wedding and events, advertising and commercial design, food, fashion, photo-journalism, fine arts, macro, reflection, abstract, infrared, street, and time-lapse photography as well as cinematography
  • Lessons about the history and science of photography
  • Traditional hands-on projects such as polaroid manipulation and building pin-hole cameras
  • Digital photography manipulation through hands-on projects using software such as Photoshop and other apps
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Pottery

What we do

  • Understand the history of pottery in within human history
  • Master the basics of creating vessels on the pottery wheel
  • Create vessels of increasing complexity and stability
  • Express creativity and artistic vision when basic skills are mastered
  • Understand and practice the firing process for the electric, raku and pit fire kilns

How we do it

  • Exploration of the history of pottery in ancient civilizations during our pit fire unit
  • Repetition of basic skills; centering, opening, pulling, shaping
  • Development of finishing skills; trimming, glazing, burnishing and forming
  • Exposure to more advanced skills; handles, lids, spouts
  • Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition

Three-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental sculptural practices
  • Explore form, shape, movement, texture, negative space and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional artistic mediums such as clay, wire, assemblage, conceptual art and installation art
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history, to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work
  • Focus on fundamental issues such as site, context and design principles to help students develop a visual vocabulary

Two-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental drawing, painting, composition, printmaking and mixed media techniques
  • Explore line, texture, color theory, perspective, and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and technological artistic mediums through a variety of programs and apps
  • Expect commitment and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Encourage personal creativity and individual expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Hands-on projects to master the formal elements and principles of design
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Also available as electives are opportunities to work as a Teacher’s Assistant (TA), take an independent study course, and to be a part of the Yearbook staff.
 

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 Physical Education Offerings

Upper School Athletics

The Parker School athletics program functions as an integral part of the total school curriculum. It provides students with opportunities to develop their talents and find their passion in a variety of physical activities. Our coaches teach the fundamentals, strategies, and rules of each sport as well as offer invaluable insight into the technical skills needed to succeed and gain self confidence. They demand excellence, have compassion, and instill integrity in our students as they play throughout the seasons. Parker School athletes may perform at different levels, but they all contribute their highest effort, are dedicated to the sport and have a winning attitude.

Parker School currently participates in the Big Island Interscholastic Federation (BIIF) athletic league in the following varsity sports:

FALL: cross-country, girls’ volleyball
WINTER: soccer, paddling
SPRING: tennis, boys’ volleyball
 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES

Powerlifting (competitive)

What we do

  • Assess each student’s overall fitness level and address specific limiting physical concerns
  • Determine lift maximums and use this as the basis for each student’s progressive training program
  • Set goals for daily and monthly training
  • Set goals for the island competition in February
  • Work on focus, persistence, and completion in the weight room
  • Work toward lifting as much weight as possible for one repetition in the squat, bench press and deadlift

How we do it

  • Three days lifting and one day conditioning each week
  • Maximal effort encouraged each day on every lift
  • Spoting, encouraging and supporting each other
  • Use of iTunes U Powerlifting course site to continue learning outside of the weight room

Conditioning

What we do

  • Introduce the concepts of healthy activity and food
  • Understand the basic anatomy and physiology of exercise
  • Introduce students to basic strength training and core conditioning
  • Develop and maintain the desire and knowledge to maintain personal fitness and pursue lifelong health and wellness

How we do it

  • A variety of muscular fitness activities
  • Proper technique for weight-assisted and body weight activities
  • Creation of a personalized “mini” workout plan

Grade 8 Math Course Offerings

Math Foundations

What we do

  • Review fractions, decimals, percents, and order of operations
  • Develop understanding of proportional relationships, operations with rational numbers; work with exponents, expressions and linear equations; solve problems with scale drawings and informal geometric construction
  • Work with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume
  • Draw inferences about populations based on samples (introduction to probability and statistics)

How we do it

  • Content discussion and demonstration
  • Group and whole class instruction
  • Application of concepts to everyday life
  • Online resources and tutorials
  • Daily practice and homework
  • Tests and quizzes

Pre-Algebra

What we do

  • Review order of operations, including associative and distributive properties
  • Review adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers
  • Develop understanding of how to simplify variable expressions
  • Practice solving equations and decimal operations using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Develop understanding of like terms and parentheses
  • Solve equations and inequalities with variables on both sides
  • Review factorization
  • Learn the rules of exponents
  • Revisit scientific notation
  • Review rational numbers and learn how to use the multiplicative inverse to solve equations and inequalities
  • Develop working knowledge of linear equations using the slope intercept formula
  • Graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Review and practice percent equations, rate of change, and interest
  • Learn basic trigonometric functions through developed understanding of triangular ratios
  • Introduce area and volume of various geometric shapes
  • Introduce geometric angular relationships

How we do it

  • Class instruction including modeling of problem solving steps
  • Practical application to everyday life situations
  • Daily practice in class and at home using online resources, board problems, and homework problems
  • Advanced calculator instruction
  • Whole group and individual question and answer sessions
  • Formal assessments and quizzes

Algebra i

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Explore data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Geometry

What we do

  • Investigate topics such as transformations, proofs, perimeter, circumference, area, and attributes of polygons with a focus on triangles
  • Engage students in an introduction to trigonometry
  • Problem-solve in real-world applications using inductive and deductive reasoning

How we do it

  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses.
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction.
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge.
  • Daily problem sets as homework

Math Counts  (elective)

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions

Grades 9 & 10 Visual Arts Course Offerings

Two-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental drawing, painting, composition, printmaking and mixed media techniques
  • Explore line, texture, color theory, perspective, and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and technological artistic mediums through a variety of programs and apps
  • Expect commitment and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Encourage personal creativity and individual expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Hands-on projects to master the formal elements and principles of design
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Three-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental sculptural practices
  • Explore form, shape, movement, texture, negative space and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional artistic mediums such as clay, wire, assemblage, conceptual art and installation art
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history, to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work
  • Focus on fundamental issues such as site, context and design principles to help students develop a visual vocabulary

Photography & Cinematography

What We Do

  • Explore photography as a historical and contemporary form of art and communication
  • Develop an understanding of the role photography has played in social, cultural, and political events from its inception in early 19th Century to the present day
  • Discover the elements and principles of design and rules of composition
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional photographic techniques such as photographic science, darkroom work, digital photography and polaroid manipulation
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Exploration of different types of photography: sports and action, portrait, nature, social and political, wedding and events, advertising and commercial design, food, fashion, photo-journalism, fine arts, macro, reflection, abstract, infrared, street, and time-lapse photography as well as cinematography
  • Lessons about the history and science of photography
  • Traditional hands-on projects such as polaroid manipulation and building pin-hole cameras
  • Digital photography manipulation through hands-on projects using software such as Photoshop and other apps
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Pottery

What we do

  • Understand the history of pottery in within human history
  • Master the basics of creating vessels on the pottery wheel
  • Create vessels of increasing complexity and stability
  • Express creativity and artistic vision when basic skills are mastered
  • Understand and practice the firing process for the electric, raku and pit fire kilns

How we do it

  • Exploration of the history of pottery in ancient civilizations during our pit fire unit
  • Repetition of basic skills; centering, opening, pulling, shaping
  • Development of finishing skills; trimming, glazing, burnishing and forming
  • Exposure to more advanced skills; handles, lids, spouts
  • Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition

Grades 6, 7 & 8 Visual Arts Course Offerings

Visual Arts i

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of drawing, painting, sculptural and digital art mediums
  • Explore the visual elements of design: line, shape, texture, color, form, space and value
  • Discover ancient cultures through their art: Paleolithic, Egyptian, Greek and Roman
  • Encourage freedom of expression and promote creativity.

How we do it

  • Application of the elements of art to various media including ceramic clay, collage, painting and drawing
  • Hands-on assignments to apply the elements of art to student projects
  • Encouragement of freedom of expression and promotion of creativity with assignments that allow for the personal creative voice of the student to be heard. For example, an assignment about transformation (in conjunction with learning about Greek Art and Mythology) which allows each student to choose a human/animal transformation and express him/herself in a unique way.

Visual Arts ii

What we do

  • Further explore the elements of art and expand to apply the principles of design to student artwork
  • Apply balance, emphasis, symmetry, rhythm, repetition and unity to various media including ceramic clay, collage and painting
  • Discover artists and art history movements of the 20th century and how they impacted the world

How we do it

  • Color organization using primary, secondary, tertiary, analogous and other color relationships applied to art projects
  • Assignments that demonstrate understanding by including exploration of symmetry, balance and emphasis
  • Exploration of a variety of mediums such as clay, collage, wire, painting, drawing and photography
  • Assignments for development of a modular repeat pattern to create rhythm and repetition, coupled with learning about an artist who applies these principles (such as Andy Warhol)

Mixed Media & Photography

What we do

  • Learn about rules of composition and apply them to student photography.
  • Place emphasis on the rule of thirds, leading lines, view point, and cropping
  • Expose students to a variety of photography genres including portrait photography, food photography, nature photography, photo journalism, and action photography
  • Discover 20th Century photographers and gain an appreciation for the medium
  • Learn about the Pulitzer Prize for photography and how photography can impact the world, public opinion and even politics

How we do it

  • Application of photography to mixed media designs, incorporating paint and collage on different surfaces from canvas to recycled glass jars
  • Exposure to various photographic artists for educational and inspirational purposes. For example, prior to the nature photography unit, students learn about Ansel Adams and how his photography played a role in creating more National Parks
  • Examination of the role photography played in WWI, The Great Depression, Vietnam and WWII to give students an understanding of how art can change the world

Drawing & Painting  (1/2 trimester elective)

What we do

  • Deepen student understanding of a range of drawing and painting approaches, including how to draw using graphite and charcoal drawing pencils, erasers and smudge sticks, as well as fine point markers
  • Learn the different ways to create shading using blending and crosshatching methods
  • Learn acrylic painting with emphasis on figure ground relationships, perspective and light/shadow

How we do it

  • Use of various subjects, such as the human figure, landscape and still life objects to explore drawing and painting
  • Use of different tools and techniques to represent form and space in drawing and painting
  • Introduction of more advanced concepts such as rendered, gestural, painterly, expressionist, stylized or abstract forms in drawing and painting

Sculpture (1/2 trimester elective)

What we do

  • Learn about Additive and Subtractive sculpture and the different methods of each
  • Explore rhythm through modular structure, negative space and movement

How we do it

  • Application of knowledge to the creation of student sculptures using different materials such as ceramic clay, foam, wood and wire
  • Exposure to many professional sculptors throughout history
  • Utilization of the elements of art and principles of design in student-designed work

Pottery (1/2 trimester elective)

What we do

  • Explore the history of pottery in various ancient civilizations
  • Learn the basics of the pottery wheel: centering, throwing, trimming and glazing
  • Participate in the Parker School Annual Pit -fire, utilizing the most ancient form of firing known to man
  • Set students up for success by establishing realistic expectations

How we do it

  • Introduction to the pottery wheel with realistic expectations. A half trimester course provides enough time to master the very basics, but it will take several weeks of trial and error.
  • Introduction of various forms of pottery, from Pompeiian and Greek to Japanese, Aztec, and Hopi, allowing students to appreciate this ancient art and culture of pottery
  • Limitation of class size to 10 students in order to maximize their personal attention from the instructor and their time on the wheel each day

Grades 6, 7 & 8 Performing Arts Course Offerings

Middle School Chorus

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of different singing opportunities
  • Develop knowledge of the elements of music, proper vocal techniques, and music reading skills
  • Sing a wide variety of quality choral music including traditional choral music, contemporary music, show choir, and a capella
  • Learn to read music and sight sing
  • Learn to sing in two part harmony
  • Include movement and dance to accompany music
  • Encourage students to engage in their learning and take leadership roles within the chorus

How we do it

  • Vocal warm-ups to ensure proper singing technique
  • Singing and listening to a wide variety of choral music
  • Whole ensemble and small group work
  • Working daily on sight singing exercises
  • Creation of a positive musical experience through community building
  • Group work leading to performance and reflection
  • Student-centered approach to learning
  • Focus on preparing and motivating students to pursue higher level choral groups within the Parker School choral program as well as individual creative interests

Acting Class

What we do

  • Develop a range of foundational acting skills including voice, body & imagination
  • Encourage confidence in public speaking, performance and self-expression

How we do it

  • Theater games, improvisation, storytelling
  • Memorizing, rehearsing and presenting short scripts

Play Production

What we do

  • Develop audition, performance and backstage skills

How we do it

  • Production of a one-act play or musical for a public audience with student investment in casting, rehearsal and performance

Dance Class

What we do

  • Introduce and practice a variety of dance styles including ballet, jazz and modern dance

How we do it

  • Basic warm-ups, locomotor skills and choreographic combinations
  • Production of a student-created live performances and/or dance videos

Improvisation

What we do 

  • Learn core fundamentals and principals of improv; how to develop a scene without a script
  • Develop a trusting creative atmosphere in the class
  • Develop a diverse range of characters and relationships that can be used within the context of any improvisational activity
  • Learn how to develop a solid storyline and narrative skills.

How we do it

  • Community building exercises
  • Improvisational scenes that encourage, trust, communication, agreement, and active listening
  • Partner and small group work
  • Repetition and practice to develop basic narrative skills

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 Performing Arts Course Offerings

Chorus

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of different singing opportunities
  • Develop knowledge of the elements of music, proper vocal techniques, and music reading skills
  • Sing a wide variety of quality choral music including traditional choral music, contemporary music, show choir, and a capella
  • Learn to read music and sight sing
  • Learn to sing in two part harmony
  • Include movement and dance to accompany music
  • Encourage students to engage in their learning and take leadership roles within the chorus

How we do it

  • Vocal warm-ups to ensure proper singing technique
  • Singing and listening to a wide variety of choral music
  • Whole ensemble and small group work
  • Working daily on sight singing exercises
  • Creation of a positive musical experience through community building
  • Group work leading to performance and reflection
  • Student-centered approach to learning
  • Focus on preparing and motivating students to pursue higher level choral groups within the Parker School choral program as well as individual creative interest

Dance        

What we do

  • Develop strength, flexibility, and musicality
  • Learn the history of different dance forms
  • Study ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean styles

How we do it

  • Instruction in ballet technique at the barre and centre floor
  • History of ballet research paper
  • Jazz warm-ups, isolations, rhythm and syncopation
  • Jazz history research paper.
  • Modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean/Dunham Technique;
  • Dance philosophy paper and final project
  • One research project each trimester
  • Stretches, warm-ups, locomotor skills, musicality and choreographic combinations appropriate to the study of each genre.
  • Opportunities for public performances throughout the year.


Choreography

What we do

  • Choreograph original pieces exploring style, theme, music selection, composition, costuming and lighting
  • Understand and utilize dance criticism for improvement

How we do it

  • Class exercises in dance improvisation and composition
  • Viewing and critique of dance performance live and on video
  • Opportunities for students to choreograph for student showcases, the fall play and/or spring musical, according to the needs of each production
  • Opportunities for live performance and video archiving of student work 

  • Pre-requisite: Grade of “B” or better in Intro to Dance Technique or permission of the teacher

Acting & Scene Study

What we do

  • Learn the actor’s basic technical skills for voice, body, and imagination
  • Study play structure and character development
  • Build on skills incrementally, including developing relationships between characters
  • Learn to work collaboratively on writing and/or producing stage and/or video projects
  • Develop skills to perform increasingly complex dramatic relationships

How we do it

  • Development of characters through improvisation games, theatre exercises, and both scripted and original individual monologues
  • Two- or three-person scenes developed through through group improvisation, rehearsal and scene study
  • Whole-class collaboration on a new project each year, such as original playwriting, staging on a short one-act play, or shooting a video short

Songwriting

What we do

  • Introduce student musicians to the fundamental techniques of songwriting and recording
  • Focus exclusively on original student compositions
  • Experience the technology of a recording studio environment as a compositional element
  • Require group collaboration and problem solving
  • Employ the full range of iPad related recording and music production resources
  • Share student songs online

How we do it

  • Assessment of individual student musical abilities and tastes
  • Training in basic performance and rehearsal strategies, including instrumentation, arrangement and practice sessions as compositional sketchpads
  • Employment of a full range of advanced music production technology from initial signal processing through multitrack recording, overdubbing and editing to final mix
  • Working in small groups with the integrity of the song as the highest priority
  • Final positing of finished student compositions to school websites

Grades 11 & 12 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of the three interscholastic debate events: policy, public forum and Lincoln-Douglas
  • Introduce students to the various drama and speech events available through the Hawaii Speech League
  • Provide instruction leading to mastery of the advanced levels of speech and debate events
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intrasquad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition
  • Traveling to six interscholastic tournaments on O’ahu and hosting two more at Parker School

Student Council

What we do

  • Plan and execute a wide variety of events to benefit the student body and the school and North Hawaii community, such as dances, pep rallies, charity drives, and community service
  • Act as a liaison between the administration and the student body and a voice for student-sponsored initiatives; solicit feedback from students about changes to policies or traditional events
  • Communicate with students about upcoming events
  • Work to positively impact student life at Parker School
  • Learn to be planners and leaders; develop confidence in one’s ideas and ability to implement them
  • Develop public speaking skills
  • Become adept at working as part of a team and sharing or alternating leadership responsibilities
  • Develop a sense of responsibility to a community and the tools to reach out and help others
  • Learn to be accountable for both successes and mistakes and to follow through on all undertakings
  • Prepare to undertake leadership roles on college campuses and in different job and life situations

How we do it

  • Officers’ and adviser’s summer retreat to share ideas, establish areas of responsibility and plan the year’s calendar
  • Yearly elections to model the democratic process; provide the student body with the opportunity to choose their representatives and feel invested in their student government; and provide candidates with an opportunity to campaign, publicly justify their candidacy and experience, write and deliver a speech, and take the risk of competing with others for office
  • Twice- weekly officer-led meetings with student council members and weekly officer planning and progress check-in meetings
  • Organization of labor into committees led by student-elected officers and representatives
  • Student ownership of ideas, process and outcomes with adviser input and guidance
  • Review of lessons learned at the end of each event
  • Abidance to student-written by-laws based on those used at other schools nationwide and revised as needed according to established guidelines stated in said by-laws
  • Student-led and –planned weekly upper school “family meetings”

MATHEMATICS

Probability & Statistics

What we do

  • Explore patterns and departures from patterns in data
  • Plan for and conduct experimental studies
  • Anticipate outcomes of random events using probability
  • Test hypotheses for statistical validity

How we do it

  • Individual and small group work collecting and analyzing data
  • Use of technology for investigation and analysis
  • Projects and laboratories
  • Development of writing skills to convey results

PERFORMING ARTS

Acting & Scene Study

What we do

  • Learn the actor’s basic technical skills for voice, body, and imagination
  • Study play structure and character development
  • Build on skills incrementally, including developing relationships between characters
  • Learn to work collaboratively on writing and/or producing stage and/or video projects
  • Develop skills to perform increasingly complex dramatic relationships

How we do it

  • Development of characters through improvisation games, theatre exercises, and both scripted and original individual monologues
  • Two- or three-person scenes developed through through group improvisation, rehearsal and scene study
  • Whole-class collaboration on a new project each year, such as original playwriting, staging on a short one-act play, or shooting a video short

Choreography

What we do

  • Choreograph original pieces exploring style, theme, music selection, composition, costuming and lighting
  • Understand and utilize dance criticism for improvement

How we do it

  • Class exercises in dance improvisation and composition
  • Viewing and critique of dance performance live and on video
  • Opportunities for students to choreograph for student showcases, the fall play and/or spring musical, according to the needs of each production
  • Opportunities for live performance and video archiving of student work 

  • Pre-requisite: Grade of “B” or better in Intro to Dance Technique or permission of the teacher

Chorus

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of different singing opportunities
  • Develop knowledge of the elements of music, proper vocal techniques, and music reading skills
  • Sing a wide variety of quality choral music including traditional choral music, contemporary music, show choir, and a capella
  • Learn to read music and sight sing
  • Learn to sing in two part harmony
  • Include movement and dance to accompany music
  • Encourage students to engage in their learning and take leadership roles within the chorus

How we do it

  • Vocal warm-ups to ensure proper singing technique
  • Singing and listening to a wide variety of choral music
  • Whole ensemble and small group work
  • Working daily on sight singing exercises
  • Creation of a positive musical experience through community building
  • Group work leading to performance and reflection
  • Student-centered approach to learning
  • Focus on preparing and motivating students to pursue higher level choral groups within the Parker School choral program as well as individual creative interest

Dance        

What we do

  • Develop strength, flexibility, and musicality
  • Learn the history of different dance forms
  • Study ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean styles

How we do it

  • Instruction in ballet technique at the barre and centre floor
  • History of ballet research paper
  • Jazz warm-ups, isolations, rhythm and syncopation
  • Jazz history research paper
  • Modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean/Dunham Technique
  • Dance philosophy paper and final project
  • One research project each trimester
  • Stretches, warm-ups, locomotor skills, musicality and choreographic combinations appropriate to the study of each genre
  • Opportunities for public performances throughout the year

Songwriting

What we do

  • Introduce student musicians to the fundamental techniques of songwriting and recording
  • Focus exclusively on original student compositions
  • Experience the technology of a recording studio environment as a compositional element
  • Require group collaboration and problem solving
  • Employ the full range of iPad related recording and music production resources
  • Share student songs online

How we do it

  • Assessment of individual student musical abilities and tastes
  • Training in basic performance and rehearsal strategies, including instrumentation, arrangement and practice sessions as compositional sketchpads
  • Employment of a full range of advanced music production technology from initial signal processing through multitrack recording, overdubbing and editing to final mix
  • Working in small groups with the integrity of the song as the highest priority
  • Final positing of finished student compositions to school websites

SCIENCE & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Anatomy & Physiology

What we do

  • Employ a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body
  • Understand basic biochemistry; cells and tissues; and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic/immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems
  • Learn the structure and function of each system
  • Explore health and medical opportunities 

How we do it

  • Use of hands-on labs including dissections
  • Student-designed and conducted experiments
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations using microscopy, building models and computer applications
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion
  • Field trips to the University of Hawaii cadaver lab
  • Year-long elective 

Marine Science

What we do

  • Study the chemical, physical, and geological aspects of the ocean
  • Gain knowledge about the ecology of various sea zones, marine communities, and the diversity of marine organisms
  • Learn the characteristics of marine phyla and how to classify a marine organism
  • Study the many aspects of ocean conservation
  • Learn about tides, currents, and wave dynamics
  • Research ichthyology, particularly fish body shape and how it relates to habitat and movement
  • Analyze sand to discover where it might have come from based on a number of geological variables
  • Explore marine archeology with a focus on Hawaii maritime history

How we do it

  • Hands-on labs including dissections and a wave tank
  • Student designed and conducted experiments
  • Scientific inquiry and investigations
  • Practice communicating and engaging in informed argument and discussion
  • Study of live creatures such as starfish, urchins, and microscopic organisms such as plankton
  • Field trips to research turtles, dolphins, and examples of shipwrecks along the coast
  • Year-long elective

Psychology

What we do

  • Examine the origins of psychology
  • Understand psychological research methods and statistics
  • Study life span, the connection between mind and body, cognitive processes, personality, and psychological disorders 
  • Explore careers in psychology

How we do it

  • Reading of case studies
  • Lab activities
  • Problem solving using the scientific method
  • Class discussions and note-taking
  • Active reading
  • Writing and research

Sociology

What we do

  • Explore the origins of sociology and theoretical sociological perspectives
  • Learn about the methods, procedures, and ethics involved in sociological research
  • Examine culture, social structures, and socialization, including within groups, formal organizations and social institutions
  • Investigate societal deviance and social control
  • Discuss inequalities of race, ethnicity, age and gender
  • Explore the impetus for and issues around social change

How we do it

  • Lectures, note-taking, lab activities, group work, skits and role playing
  • Conducting sociological research (via readings, primary source documents, case studies, media and surveys)
  • Learning and applying problem-solving skills in analyzing and interpreting data

VISUAL ARTS

Ap Studio Art 

What we do

  • Create, grow, aspire, inspire, fail, succeed, progress, discover 
  • Create a portfolio of college-level work and, at the end of the school year, submit it for evaluation; a qualifying portfolio score can earn students college credit and/or advanced placement in college courses
  • Choose from three courses: Drawing, 2-D Design and 3-D Design
  • Create a portfolio with three sections: Quality, Concentration (Sustained Investigation), and Breadth (Range of Approaches)

How we do it

  • Commitment to the thoughtful, sustained investigation of a specific visual idea in the Concentration (Sustained Investigation Section); the works should be conceptually and visually related and must show progression, growth and discovery
  • Individual selection of concentration from infinite choices
  • Introduction to hundreds of examples of possible concentrations to provide a sense of range, such as a series of works that begin with representational interpretations and evolve into abstraction,  design and execution of pages from a book, a series of political cartoons, landscape photography, and sculptures dealing with the human figure and transformation 
  • Creation of work in the Breadth (Range of Approaches) section that demonstrates understanding of the elements and principles of design, including unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, negative space, and proportion/scale
  • Demonstration in the Breadth sections of a range of conceptual and or technical approaches through a variety of media
  • Specific Breadth assignments and deadlines
  • Development of personal voice and body of work occupies the bulk of a student’s time. They are encouraged to be artists first and foremost; to explore, discover and grow.

Photography & Cinematography

What We Do

  • Explore photography as a historical and contemporary form of art and communication
  • Develop an understanding of the role photography has played in social, cultural, and political events from its inception in early 19th Century to the present day
  • Discover the elements and principles of design and rules of composition
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional photographic techniques such as photographic science, darkroom work, digital photography and polaroid manipulation
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Exploration of different types of photography: sports and action, portrait, nature, social and political, wedding and events, advertising and commercial design, food, fashion, photo-journalism, fine arts, macro, reflection, abstract, infrared, street, and time-lapse photography as well as cinematography
  • Lessons about the history and science of photography
  • Traditional hands-on projects such as polaroid manipulation and building pin-hole cameras
  • Digital photography manipulation through hands-on projects using software such as Photoshop and other apps
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Pottery

What we do

  • Understand the history of pottery in within human history
  • Master the basics of creating vessels on the pottery wheel
  • Create vessels of increasing complexity and stability
  • Express creativity and artistic vision when basic skills are mastered
  • Understand and practice the firing process for the electric, raku and pit fire kilns

How we do it

  • Exploration of the history of pottery in ancient civilizations during our pit fire unit
  • Repetition of basic skills; centering, opening, pulling, shaping
  • Development of finishing skills; trimming, glazing, burnishing and forming
  • Exposure to more advanced skills; handles, lids, spouts
  • Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition

Three-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental sculptural practices
  • Explore form, shape, movement, texture, negative space and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional artistic mediums such as clay, wire, assemblage, conceptual art and installation art
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history, to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work
  • Focus on fundamental issues such as site, context and design principles to help students develop a visual vocabulary

Two-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental drawing, painting, composition, printmaking and mixed media techniques
  • Explore line, texture, color theory, perspective, and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and technological artistic mediums through a variety of programs and apps
  • Expect commitment and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Encourage personal creativity and individual expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Hands-on projects to master the formal elements and principles of design
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Also available as electives are opportunities to work as a Teacher’s Assistant (TA), take an independent study course, and to be a part of the Yearbook staff.

 

Grade 9 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of the three interscholastic debate events: policy, public forum and Lincoln-Douglas
  • Introduce students to the various drama and speech events available through the Hawaii Speech League
  • Provide instruction leading to mastery of the advanced levels of speech and debate events
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intrasquad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition
  • Traveling to six interscholastic tournaments on O’ahu and hosting two more at Parker School

Student Council

What we do

  • Plan and execute a wide variety of events to benefit the student body and the school and North Hawaii community, such as dances, pep rallies, charity drives, and community service
  • Act as a liaison between the administration and the student body and a voice for student-sponsored initiatives; solicit feedback from students about changes to policies or traditional events
  • Communicate with students about upcoming events
  • Work to positively impact student life at Parker School
  • Learn to be planners and leaders; develop confidence in one’s ideas and ability to implement them
  • Develop public speaking skills
  • Become adept at working as part of a team and sharing or alternating leadership responsibilities
  • Develop a sense of responsibility to a community and the tools to reach out and help others
  • Learn to be accountable for both successes and mistakes and to follow through on all undertakings
  • Prepare to undertake leadership roles on college campuses and in different job and life situations

How we do it

  • Officers’ and adviser’s summer retreat to share ideas, establish areas of responsibility and plan the year’s calendar
  • Yearly elections to model the democratic process; provide the student body with the opportunity to choose their representatives and feel invested in their student government; and provide candidates with an opportunity to campaign, publicly justify their candidacy and experience, write and deliver a speech, and take the risk of competing with others for office
  • Twice- weekly officer-led meetings with student council members and weekly officer planning and progress check-in meetings
  • Organization of labor into committees led by student-elected officers and representatives
  • Student ownership of ideas, process and outcomes with adviser input and guidance
  • Review of lessons learned at the end of each event
  • Abidance to student-written by-laws based on those used at other schools nationwide and revised as needed according to established guidelines stated in said by-laws
  • Student-led and –planned weekly upper school “family meetings”

PERFORMING ARTS

Acting & Scene Study

What we do

  • Learn the actor’s basic technical skills for voice, body, and imagination
  • Study play structure and character development
  • Build on skills incrementally, including developing relationships between characters
  • Learn to work collaboratively on writing and/or producing stage and/or video projects
  • Develop skills to perform increasingly complex dramatic relationships

How we do it

  • Development of characters through improvisation games, theatre exercises, and both scripted and original individual monologues
  • Two- or three-person scenes developed through through group improvisation, rehearsal and scene study
  • Whole-class collaboration on a new project each year, such as original playwriting, staging on a short one-act play, or shooting a video short

Choreography

What we do

  • Choreograph original pieces exploring style, theme, music selection, composition, costuming and lighting
  • Understand and utilize dance criticism for improvement

How we do it

  • Class exercises in dance improvisation and composition
  • Viewing and critique of dance performance live and on video
  • Opportunities for students to choreograph for student showcases, the fall play and/or spring musical, according to the needs of each production
  • Opportunities for live performance and video archiving of student work 

  • Pre-requisite: Grade of “B” or better in Intro to Dance Technique or permission of the teacher

Chorus

What we do

  • Introduce a variety of different singing opportunities
  • Develop knowledge of the elements of music, proper vocal techniques, and music reading skills
  • Sing a wide variety of quality choral music including traditional choral music, contemporary music, show choir, and a capella
  • Learn to read music and sight sing
  • Learn to sing in two part harmony
  • Include movement and dance to accompany music
  • Encourage students to engage in their learning and take leadership roles within the chorus

How we do it

  • Vocal warm-ups to ensure proper singing technique
  • Singing and listening to a wide variety of choral music
  • Whole ensemble and small group work
  • Working daily on sight singing exercises
  • Creation of a positive musical experience through community building
  • Group work leading to performance and reflection
  • Student-centered approach to learning
  • Focus on preparing and motivating students to pursue higher level choral groups within the Parker School choral program as well as individual creative interest

Dance        

What we do

  • Develop strength, flexibility, and musicality
  • Learn the history of different dance forms
  • Study ballet, jazz, modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean styles

How we do it

  • Instruction in ballet technique at the barre and centre floor
  • History of ballet research paper
  • Jazz warm-ups, isolations, rhythm and syncopation
  • Jazz history research paper
  • Modern/contemporary and African-Caribbean/Dunham Technique
  • Dance philosophy paper and final project
  • One research project each trimester
  • Stretches, warm-ups, locomotor skills, musicality and choreographic combinations appropriate to the study of each genre
  • Opportunities for public performances throughout the year

Songwriting

What we do

  • Introduce student musicians to the fundamental techniques of songwriting and recording
  • Focus exclusively on original student compositions
  • Experience the technology of a recording studio environment as a compositional element
  • Require group collaboration and problem solving
  • Employ the full range of iPad related recording and music production resources
  • Share student songs online

How we do it

  • Assessment of individual student musical abilities and tastes
  • Training in basic performance and rehearsal strategies, including instrumentation, arrangement and practice sessions as compositional sketchpads
  • Employment of a full range of advanced music production technology from initial signal processing through multitrack recording, overdubbing and editing to final mix
  • Working in small groups with the integrity of the song as the highest priority
  • Final positing of finished student compositions to school websites

VISUAL ARTS

Photography & Cinematography

What We Do

  • Explore photography as a historical and contemporary form of art and communication
  • Develop an understanding of the role photography has played in social, cultural, and political events from its inception in early 19th Century to the present day
  • Discover the elements and principles of design and rules of composition
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional photographic techniques such as photographic science, darkroom work, digital photography and polaroid manipulation
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Exploration of different types of photography: sports and action, portrait, nature, social and political, wedding and events, advertising and commercial design, food, fashion, photo-journalism, fine arts, macro, reflection, abstract, infrared, street, and time-lapse photography as well as cinematography
  • Lessons about the history and science of photography
  • Traditional hands-on projects such as polaroid manipulation and building pin-hole cameras
  • Digital photography manipulation through hands-on projects using software such as Photoshop and other apps
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Pottery

What we do

  • Understand the history of pottery in within human history
  • Master the basics of creating vessels on the pottery wheel
  • Create vessels of increasing complexity and stability
  • Express creativity and artistic vision when basic skills are mastered
  • Understand and practice the firing process for the electric, raku and pit fire kilns

How we do it

  • Exploration of the history of pottery in ancient civilizations during our pit fire unit
  • Repetition of basic skills; centering, opening, pulling, shaping
  • Development of finishing skills; trimming, glazing, burnishing and forming
  • Exposure to more advanced skills; handles, lids, spouts
  • Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition

Three-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental sculptural practices
  • Explore form, shape, movement, texture, negative space and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional artistic mediums such as clay, wire, assemblage, conceptual art and installation art
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history, to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work
  • Focus on fundamental issues such as site, context and design principles to help students develop a visual vocabulary

Two-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental drawing, painting, composition, printmaking and mixed media techniques
  • Explore line, texture, color theory, perspective, and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and technological artistic mediums through a variety of programs and apps
  • Expect commitment and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Encourage personal creativity and individual expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Hands-on projects to master the formal elements and principles of design
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Also available as electives are opportunities to work as a Teacher’s Assistant (TA), take an independent study course, and to be a part of the Yearbook staff.
 

Grade 9 Math Course Offerings

Pre-Algebra

What we do

  • Review order of operations, including associative and distributive properties
  • Review adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers
  • Develop understanding of how to simplify variable expressions
  • Practice solving equations and decimal operations using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Develop understanding of like terms and parentheses
  • Solve equations and inequalities with variables on both sides
  • Review factorization
  • Learn the rules of exponents
  • Revisit scientific notation
  • Review rational numbers and learn how to use the multiplicative inverse to solve equations and inequalities
  • Develop working knowledge of linear equations using the slope intercept formula
  • Graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Review and practice percent equations, rate of change, and interest
  • Learn basic trigonometric functions through developed understanding of triangular ratios
  • Introduce area and volume of various geometric shapes
  • Introduce geometric angular relationships

How we do it

  • Class instruction including modeling of problem solving steps
  • Practical application to everyday life situations
  • Daily practice in class and at home using online resources, board problems, and homework problems
  • Advanced calculator instruction
  • Whole group and individual question and answer sessions
  • Formal assessments and quizzes

Algebra i

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Explore data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Geometry

What we do

  • Investigate topics such as transformations, proofs, perimeter, circumference, area, and attributes of polygons with a focus on triangles
  • Engage students in an introduction to trigonometry
  • Problem-solve in real-world applications using inductive and deductive reasoning

How we do it

  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses.
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction.
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge.
  • Daily problem sets as homework

Algebra ii

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Practice data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Algebra ii/Trigonometry

What we do

  • Practice polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Learn systems of polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Solve problems using exponents and logarithms
  • Solve analytic geometry equations
  • Develop an understanding of trigonometry

How we do it

  • Development of advanced algebra skills
  • Daily practice solving mathematical problems
  • Use and programming of T.I. calculator

Pre-Calculus

What we do

  • Learn about how equations and their graphs relate to mathematical models
  • Work with periodic functions and their different components
  • Use parametric functions to model real world situations
  • Explore the properties of polar coordinates and relation to polar equations for conic sections
  • Use matrices to perform transformations and complete iterations
  • Investigate fractals, their dimensions, and how to perceive them in nature
  • Examine sequences and series and learn how to derive formulas for them
  • Provide an introduction to calculus comprising of limits, derivatives, and integrals

How we do it

  • Inductive and deductive reasoning to problem solve in real-world applications of topics
  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions and to compute quantities

ap Calculus ab

What we do

  • Gain knowledge of limits as they are related to integrals and learn how to take the limit of different combinations of functions.
  • Study how to take derivatives of a number of different functions and how to apply derivatives to acceleration, maxima and minima, and velocity
  • Discover how to take the indefinite and definite integral of a number of different functions and how to apply integrals to area, mass, pressure, and volume
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a first semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework

Grade 10 Math Course Offerings

Algebra i

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Explore data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Geometry

What we do

  • Investigate topics such as transformations, proofs, perimeter, circumference, area, and attributes of polygons with a focus on triangles
  • Engage students in an introduction to trigonometry
  • Problem-solve in real-world applications using inductive and deductive reasoning

How we do it

  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses.
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction.
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge.
  • Daily problem sets as homework

Algebra ii

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Practice data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Algebra ii/Trigonometry

What we do

  • Practice polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Learn systems of polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Solve problems using exponents and logarithms
  • Solve analytic geometry equations
  • Develop an understanding of trigonometry

How we do it

  • Development of advanced algebra skills
  • Daily practice solving mathematical problems
  • Use and programming of T.I. calculator

Pre-Calculus

What we do

  • Learn about how equations and their graphs relate to mathematical models
  • Work with periodic functions and their different components
  • Use parametric functions to model real world situations
  • Explore the properties of polar coordinates and relation to polar equations for conic sections
  • Use matrices to perform transformations and complete iterations
  • Investigate fractals, their dimensions, and how to perceive them in nature
  • Examine sequences and series and learn how to derive formulas for them
  • Provide an introduction to calculus comprising of limits, derivatives, and integrals

How we do it

  • Inductive and deductive reasoning to problem solve in real-world applications of topics
  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions and to compute quantities

Ap Calculus Ab

What we do

  • Gain knowledge of limits as they are related to integrals and learn how to take the limit of different combinations of functions.
  • Study how to take derivatives of a number of different functions and how to apply derivatives to acceleration, maxima and minima, and velocity
  • Discover how to take the indefinite and definite integral of a number of different functions and how to apply integrals to area, mass, pressure, and volume
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a first semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework

Ap Calculus Bc

What we do

  • Become skilled at physics-based problems that focus on work, force, and variable-factor products
  • Study sequences and series, particularly power, Taylor and Maclaurin series and discover how limits are related to series and integrals are related to sequences
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a second semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Acceptance of students who have completed AP Calculus AB as a pre-requisite for the class
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homeworks

Grade 11 Math Course Offerings

Geometry

What we do

  • Investigate topics such as transformations, proofs, perimeter, circumference, area, and attributes of polygons with a focus on triangles
  • Engage students in an introduction to trigonometry
  • Problem-solve in real-world applications using inductive and deductive reasoning

How we do it

  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses.
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction.
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge.
  • Daily problem sets as homework

Algebra ii

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Practice data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Algebra ii/Trigonometry

What we do

  • Practice polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Learn systems of polynomial functions and inequalities
  • Solve problems using exponents and logarithms
  • Solve analytic geometry equations
  • Develop an understanding of trigonometry

How we do it

  • Development of advanced algebra skills
  • Daily practice solving mathematical problems
  • Use and programming of T.I. calculator

Probability & Statistics  (elective)

What we do

  • Explore patterns and departures from patterns in data
  • Plan for and conduct experimental studies
  • Anticipate outcomes of random events using probability
  • Test hypotheses for statistical validity

How we do it

  • Individual and small group work collecting and analyzing data
  • Use of technology for investigation and analysis
  • Projects and laboratories
  • Development of writing skills to convey results

Pre-Calculus

What we do

  • Learn about how equations and their graphs relate to mathematical models
  • Work with periodic functions and their different components
  • Use parametric functions to model real world situations
  • Explore the properties of polar coordinates and relation to polar equations for conic sections
  • Use matrices to perform transformations and complete iterations
  • Investigate fractals, their dimensions, and how to perceive them in nature
  • Examine sequences and series and learn how to derive formulas for them
  • Provide an introduction to calculus comprising of limits, derivatives, and integrals

How we do it

  • Inductive and deductive reasoning to problem solve in real-world applications of topics
  • Compliance with national standards to prepare students for future math courses
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions and to compute quantities

Ap Calculus Ab

What we do

  • Gain knowledge of limits as they are related to integrals and learn how to take the limit of different combinations of functions.
  • Study how to take derivatives of a number of different functions and how to apply derivatives to acceleration, maxima and minima, and velocity
  • Discover how to take the indefinite and definite integral of a number of different functions and how to apply integrals to area, mass, pressure, and volume
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a first semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homework

Ap Calculus Bc

What we do

  • Become skilled at physics-based problems that focus on work, force, and variable-factor products
  • Study sequences and series, particularly power, Taylor and Maclaurin series and discover how limits are related to series and integrals are related to sequences
  • Closely follow the College Board syllabus to prepare students for the AP exam in May
  • Provide students with a solid background so that they may have success on the AP exam and in future Calculus classes
  • Provide a course similar to a second semester calculus course at most universities and colleges

How we do it

  • Acceptance of students who have completed AP Calculus AB as a pre-requisite for the class
  • Use of graphing calculators to model and research different functions, to compute quantities, and to take the derivatives and integrals of functions
  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams to assess student knowledge
  • Daily problem sets given as homeworks

Grades 11 & 12 Visual Arts Course Offerings

Two-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental drawing, painting, composition, printmaking and mixed media techniques
  • Explore line, texture, color theory, perspective, and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and technological artistic mediums through a variety of programs and apps
  • Expect commitment and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Encourage personal creativity and individual expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Hands-on projects to master the formal elements and principles of design
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

three-Dimensional Art

What We Do

  • Introduce student artists to fundamental sculptural practices
  • Explore form, shape, movement, texture, negative space and other elements and principles of art
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional artistic mediums such as clay, wire, assemblage, conceptual art and installation art
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations
  • Review basic techniques while building towards more advanced skills

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Lectures on major contemporary artists and art movements through history, to provide a broader appreciation for art
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work
  • Focus on fundamental issues such as site, context and design principles to help students develop a visual vocabulary

Photography & Cinematography

What We Do

  • Explore photography as a historical and contemporary form of art and communication
  • Develop an understanding of the role photography has played in social, cultural, and political events from its inception in early 19th Century to the present day
  • Discover the elements and principles of design and rules of composition
  • Experience traditional and nontraditional photographic techniques such as photographic science, darkroom work, digital photography and polaroid manipulation
  • Expect commitment, excellence and attention to detail for optimal artistic growth
  • Foster and encourage personal creativity and individual artistic expression
  • Critique peer work in group presentations

How We Do It

  • Mastery of the formal elements and principles of design through hands-on projects
  • Exploration of different types of photography: sports and action, portrait, nature, social and political, wedding and events, advertising and commercial design, food, fashion, photo-journalism, fine arts, macro, reflection, abstract, infrared, street, and time-lapse photography as well as cinematography
  • Lessons about the history and science of photography
  • Traditional hands-on projects such as polaroid manipulation and building pin-hole cameras
  • Digital photography manipulation through hands-on projects using software such as Photoshop and other apps
  • Final critiques and exhibitions of finished student work

Pottery

What we do

  • Understand the history of pottery in within human history
  • Master the basics of creating vessels on the pottery wheel
  • Create vessels of increasing complexity and stability
  • Express creativity and artistic vision when basic skills are mastered
  • Understand and practice the firing process for the electric, raku and pit fire kilns

How we do it

  • Exploration of the history of pottery in ancient civilizations during our pit fire unit
  • Repetition of basic skills; centering, opening, pulling, shaping
  • Development of finishing skills; trimming, glazing, burnishing and forming
  • Exposure to more advanced skills; handles, lids, spouts
  • Repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition

ap Studio Art 

What we do

  • Create, grow, aspire, inspire, fail, succeed, progress, discover 
  • Create a portfolio of college-level work and, at the end of the school year, submit it for evaluation; a qualifying portfolio score can earn students college credit and/or advanced placement in college courses 
  • Choose from three courses: Drawing, 2-D Design and 3-D Design
  • Create a portfolio with three sections: Quality, Concentration (Sustained Investigation), and Breadth (Range of Approaches)

How we do it

  • Commitment to the thoughtful, sustained investigation of a specific visual idea in the Concentration (Sustained Investigation Section); the works should be conceptually and visually related and must show progression, growth and discovery
  • Individual selection of concentration from infinite choices
  • Introduction to hundreds of examples of possible concentrations to provide a sense of range, such as a series of works that begin with representational interpretations and evolve into abstraction,  design and execution of pages from a book, a series of political cartoons, landscape photography, and sculptures dealing with the human figure and transformation 
  • Creation of work in the Breadth (Range of Approaches) section that demonstrates understanding of the elements and principles of design, including unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, negative space, and proportion/scale
  • Demonstration in the Breadth sections of a range of conceptual and or technical approaches through a variety of media
  • Specific Breadth assignments and deadlines
  • Development of personal voice and body of work occupies the bulk of a student’s time. They are encouraged to be artists first and foremost; to explore, discover and grow

Grades 6 & 7 Spanish Course Offerings

Spanish 1A

What we do

  • Introduce vocabulary pertaining to: calendar, body parts, weather, time, school supplies and the classroom, food and fitness, and sports and leisure activities
  • Study and use verbs ending in –ar, -er and –ir, as well as question words
  • Learn proper uses of ser and estar and ir
  • Count from 1 -100
  • Express student likes, dislikes, and pastimes
  • Learn adjective agreement and pronouns

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including research and report on winter holiday traditions in Latin America, Cinco de Mayo and a poem all about “me”
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 1B

What we do

  • Review Spanish 1A grammar and vocabulary
  • Introduce vocabulary pertaining to: family and fiesta, restaurant, shopping, house, chores and vacation
  • Introduce grammar pertaining to: irregular and stem-changing verbs, possessive adjectives, affirmative tú commands, direct object pronouns, preterite and present progressive verb tenses

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including researching and reporting on an influential Hispanic person and creating family trees and a fashion show film using iMovie
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 2A

What we do

  • Review Spanish 1B grammar and vocabulary
  • Learn the regular and irregular form of preterite tense verbs, the imperfect tense of verbs, negative and affirmative words and reflexive verbs
  • Discuss extracurricular activities and the school day
  • Practice navigating a city, giving directions and reading a map
  • Describe daily routines, shopping and money
  • Talk about childhood activities and celebrations

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including making a personal timeline and creating a childhood memoir
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Spanish 2B

What we do

  • Review Spanish 2A grammar and vocabulary
  • Expand on the use of the preterite and imperfect verbs
  • Learn the present perfect tense, indirect object pronouns, negative commands and impersonal se, usted and ustedes commands and use of por
  • Discuss heroic acts, natural disasters and accidents
  • Understand the cultural significance of fútbol and cultural perspectives on television
  • Describe movies, plots and characters
  • Follow a recipe and use cooking expressions
  • Plan all aspects of a trip and learn appropriate tourist behavior

How we do it

  • Differentiated activities
  • Skits, songs and games
  • Class discussions
  • Multimedia projects and presentations
  • Online activities
  • Conversation
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Projects, including creating a news show filmed with iMovie, making a board game and filming a cooking show
  • Use of authentic Spanish language materials for exposure to Spanish culture and traditions

Grade 6 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

Grade 6 Transition  (required)

What we do

  • Help prepare students (and parents) for the transition from elementary school to middle school
  • Familiarize students with the “ins and outs” of Parker School
  • Create a strong foundational support system between student, parent, and teacher
  • Develop time management and organizational skills
  • Learn how to effectively and appropriately use technology
  • Enhance students’ comfort level by discussing common concerns that arise in middle school and equipping them with skills necessary to be successful
  • Introduce, excite, and encourage students toward confidence and success

How we do it

  • Teacher-led discussions with active class participation
  • Emphasizing the importance of using a daily planner effectively, exploring various time-management routines and organizational strategies
  • Familiarizing students with our Rediker grading and communication program
  • Tours of campus and introduction to faculty and staff, explaining how each employee role at Parker supports every individual’s success
  • Reviewing handbook with students so that expectations are clear and every individual feels safe
  • Aiding technology set-up including: email, grade program, and iTunes U; teaching how to navigate through commonly used apps on iPads
  • Team building games and activities
  • Role playing various middle school scenarios (involving problem-solving skills, making good choices, and responsibility)
  • Discussing and encouraging extracurricular involvement as a way to establish positive relationships
  • Weekly communication with parents, providing them with ideas on how to communicate, support, and lovingly set boundaries with their blossoming individual

New Media

What we do

  • Understand new media tools/technologies and their use in the context of Parker School’s core values of excellence, integrity and compassion.
  • Create our own art/writing/ideas and pair with the most effective medium for communication and sharing

How we do it

  • Utilization of safety and ethics materials from Common Sense Media and various other digital resources
  • Exploration and creation of students’ visual, audio, written and technological ideas using their iPads and other personal devices (with parental permission)
  • Utilization of current Internet and iPad tools to format and share the work

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of public forum debate
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intra-squad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition

MATHEMATICS

Math Counts

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions

SCIENCE & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Bridge Building

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Forensics

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Space Science & Technology

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Grade 8 Elective Course Offerings

GENERAL

New Media

What we do

  • Understand new media tools/technologies and their use in the context of Parker School’s core values of excellence, integrity and compassion.
  • Create our own art/writing/ideas and pair with the most effective medium for communication and sharing

How we do it

  • Utilization of safety and ethics materials from Common Sense Media and various other digital resources
  • Exploration and creation of students’ visual, audio, written and technological ideas using their iPads and other personal devices (with parental permission)
  • Utilization of current Internet and iPad tools to format and share the work

Speech & Debate

What we do

  • Introduce students to the fundamentals of  public forum debate
  • Support students to become more effective as speakers
  • Teach the essentials of writing effective debate cases
  • Teach the fundamentals of academic research
  • Offer opportunities for significant leadership experiences
  • Prepare students to succeed in interscholastic competition

How we do it

  • Traditional classroom lectures
  • Practice rounds against intra-squad opponents
  • Feedback and editing of written cases
  • Mentoring of new students by experienced competitors
  • Coaching for success in interscholastic competition

MATHEMATICS

Math Counts

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions

SCIENCE & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Bridge Building

What we do

  • Explore, lean and discover bridges, bridge design, and bridge construction
  • Learn to recognize design components and how structural components react to stress

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups
  • Bridge Building challenges using a variety of materials for construction and tested for strength and endurance

Ecology & Hawaiian Studies

What We Do

  • Explore the various relationships that exist in nature
  • Build and explore a school farm program known as Kīhāpai Ho‘oulu
  • Explore Hawaiian cultural practices
  • Explore the impact of traditional ecological knowledge
  • Learn about soil and insect science
  • Encourage community involvement
  • Improve literacy
  • Promote confidence in public speaking
  • Discover future career opportunities in land conservation

How We Do It

  • Activity-based learning opportunities for students utilizing the Parker School garden, Kīhāpai Ho’oulu
  • Soil food web analysis
  • Identification of symbiotic and parasitic relationships in nature
  • Soil fertility research
  • Recycling of organic matter through composting
  • Adoption of/assisting a plant of each student’s choosing
  • Observation and recording of insect behavior
  • Traditional Hawaiian cultivation techniques
  • Lei making with ki leaf
  • Use of art, poetry and writing
  • Vocalization of Hawaiian chants
  • Participation at a Saturday Parker School farmers’ market booth
  • Taking fresh produce home to students’ families

Forensics

What we do

  • Process crime scenes, collect and preserve evidence, and analyze organic and inorganic evidence such as hair, fibers, and fingerprints
  • Evaluate the evidential value of a crime scene and how it supports criminal and civil laws, as enforced by police

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based learning for individuals and learning groups

Space Science & Techonology

What we do

  • Study topics including aerodynamics, lasers, robotics, final frontier, geodesics, space stations, topography of unknown environments, sun observations, and model rocketry

How we do it

  • Application of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) principles using activities- based cooperative learning groups

Grade 6 Math Course Offerings

Math Skills

What we do

  • Investigate the application of positive and negative numbers and the coordinate plane
  • Work with ratios, rates, fractions, decimals, percents and exponents
  • Introduce variables and equations
  • Introduce simple two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume
  • Explore statistical variability and distribution
  • Use estimation as a way to validate solutions

How we do it

  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Application of concepts to everyday life
  • Daily practice on the SmartBoard and dry erase board
  • Daily homework
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams

Math Foundations

What we do

  • Review fractions, decimals, percents, and order of operations
  • Develop understanding of proportional relationships, operations with rational numbers; work with exponents, expressions and linear equations; solve problems with scale drawings and informal geometric construction
  • Work with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume
  • Draw inferences about populations based on samples (introduction to probability and statistics)

How we do it

  • Content discussion and demonstration
  • Group and whole class instruction
  • Application of concepts to everyday life
  • Online resources and tutorials
  • Daily practice and homework
  • Tests and quizzes

Pre-Algebra

What we do

  • Review order of operations, including associative and distributive properties
  • Review adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers
  • Develop understanding of how to simplify variable expressions
  • Practice solving equations and decimal operations using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Develop understanding of like terms and parentheses
  • Solve equations and inequalities with variables on both sides
  • Review factorization
  • Learn the rules of exponents
  • Revisit scientific notation
  • Review rational numbers and learn how to use the multiplicative inverse to solve equations and inequalities
  • Develop working knowledge of linear equations using the slope intercept formula
  • Graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Review and practice percent equations, rate of change, and interest
  • Learn basic trigonometric functions through developed understanding of triangular ratios
  • Introduce area and volume of various geometric shapes
  • Introduce geometric angular relationships

How we do it

  • Class instruction including modeling of problem solving steps
  • Practical application to everyday life situations
  • Daily practice in class and at home using online resources, board problems, and homework problems
  • Advanced calculator instruction
  • Whole group and individual question and answer sessions
  • Formal assessments and quizzes

Math Counts  (elective)

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions

Grade 7 Math Course Offerings

Math Skills

What we do

  • Investigate the application of positive and negative numbers and the coordinate plane
  • Work with ratios, rates, fractions, decimals, percents and exponents
  • Introduce variables and equations
  • Introduce simple two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume
  • Explore statistical variability and distribution
  • Use estimation as a way to validate solutions

How we do it

  • Small group and whole class work and instruction
  • Application of concepts to everyday life
  • Daily practice on the SmartBoard and dry erase board
  • Daily homework
  • Tests, quizzes, and exams

Math Foundations

What we do

  • Review fractions, decimals, percents, and order of operations
  • Develop understanding of proportional relationships, operations with rational numbers; work with exponents, expressions and linear equations; solve problems with scale drawings and informal geometric construction
  • Work with two- and three-dimensional shapes to solve problems involving area, surface area, and volume
  • Draw inferences about populations based on samples (introduction to probability and statistics)

How we do it

  • Content discussion and demonstration
  • Group and whole class instruction
  • Application of concepts to everyday life
  • Online resources and tutorials
  • Daily practice and homework
  • Tests and quizzes

Pre-Algebra

What we do

  • Review order of operations, including associative and distributive properties
  • Review adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing integers
  • Develop understanding of how to simplify variable expressions
  • Practice solving equations and decimal operations using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Develop understanding of like terms and parentheses
  • Solve equations and inequalities with variables on both sides
  • Review factorization
  • Learn the rules of exponents
  • Revisit scientific notation
  • Review rational numbers and learn how to use the multiplicative inverse to solve equations and inequalities
  • Develop working knowledge of linear equations using the slope intercept formula
  • Graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Review and practice percent equations, rate of change, and interest
  • Learn basic trigonometric functions through developed understanding of triangular ratios
  • Introduce area and volume of various geometric shapes
  • Introduce geometric angular relationships

How we do it

  • Class instruction including modeling of problem solving steps
  • Practical application to everyday life situations
  • Daily practice in class and at home using online resources, board problems, and homework problems
  • Advanced calculator instruction
  • Whole group and individual question and answer sessions
  • Formal assessments and quizzes

Algebra i

What we do

  • Use variables in linear and quadratic equations to model real-life situations
  • Solve and graph linear equations and inequalities
  • Solve systems of linear equations using three methods
  • Factor and simplify polynomial and exponential expressions
  • Solve quadratic equations using multiple techniques
  • Explore data analysis and probability
  • Develop students’ understanding of independent and dependent variables

How we do it

  • Classroom presentations and examples
  • Tests and quizzes
  • Daily practice on the board
  • Daily homework

Math Counts  (elective)

What we do

  • Engage middle school students of all abilities and interest levels in a fun, challenging math program
  • Develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills
  • Nurture students’ love of math
  • Help students overcome fear of math and build confidence in their math abilities
  • Prepare students for district level competition

How we do it

  • Creating a space where learning math is fun, social and supportive
  • Learning how to analyze problems and extract important information
  • Practicing solving problems with both speed and efficiency
  • Demonstrating multiple approaches to problem solving through teacher modeling
  • Engaging in “bee-style” class competitions